The Giants who built the Mount from LEGEND LAND - 14 Legends from Poldark Country

The Giants who built the Mount from LEGEND LAND – 14 Legends from Poldark Country

St. Michael’s Mount, that impressive castle-crowned pyramid of rock that rises from the waters of Mounts Bay, was not always an island. In fact, it is not always an island now. At low tide you may reach it from the mainland along a causeway. But once upon a time the Mount stood in the midst of a forest; its old name, “Caraclowse in Cowse,” means “the Grey Rock in the Wood,” and that was at the time when the Giants built it.

 

Cormoran was one of the Giants; he lived in this great western forest, which is now swallowed up by the sea, and there he determined to erect for himself a stronghold that should rise well above the trees. So he set to work to collect huge stones from the neighbouring granite hills, and his new home grew apace.

 

But the labour of searching far afield for suitable stones, and of carrying them to the forest and piling them one upon another, was a wearying task even for a giant, and as Cormoran grew tired he forced his unfortunate Giantess wife, Cormelian, to help him in his task, and to her he gave the most toilsome of the labour.

 

Was there a gigantic boulder in a far part of the Duchy that Cormoran coveted, unhappy Cormelian was sent to fetch it; and she, like a dutiful wife, never complained, but went meekly about her work, collecting the finest and biggest stones and carrying them back to the forest in her apron. Meanwhile Cormoran, growing more lazy, spent much of his time in sleep, waking up only very occasionally to admonish his wife or to incite her to greater efforts.

 

One day, when Cormelian had been twice as far as the Bodmin moors to fetch some particularly fine stones Cormoran had seen, and was about to set off on a third journey, she, noticing her husband fast asleep, thought to save herself another weary walk by going only a short distance and breaking off some huge masses of greenstone rock which existed in the neighbourhood and placing them upon the nearly completed Mount without being seen. Although Cormoran had insisted that the stone be grey, Cormelian could see no reason why one stone was not as good as another.

 

So, carrying out her plan, she was returning with the first enormous piece of greenstone, walking ever so carefully so as not to awaken Cormoran, when, unfortunately, he did awake. He flew into a terrible rage on seeing how his wife was trying to delude him, and, rising with a dreadful threat, he ran after her, overtaking her just before she reached the Mount.

 

Scolding her for her deceit, he gave her a terrific box on the ear. Poor Cormelian, in her fright, dropped the huge greenstone she was carrying, and ran sobbing from her angry husband to seek refuge in the deepest part of the forest; and it was not until Cormoran himself had finished building the Mount that she would return to him.

 

And to-day, as you walk along the causeway from Marazion to St. Michael’s Mount, you will see on your right hand an isolated mass of greenstone, the very rock that Cormelian dropped. It is called Chapel Rock now, because years and years afterwards, when pious monks lived upon the summit of the Mount and devout pilgrims used to visit their church to pay homage at a shrine, they built a little chapel, upon poor Cormelian’s green rock, of which only a few stones now remain.

 

You may visit Chapel Rock and St. Michael’s Mount from Penzance, which is between three and four miles away and is the ideal centre for some of the most wonderful scenery in Cornwall. Both Land’s End and the Lizard are within easy reach of this, England’s westernmost town, where a climate that rivals that of the Mediterranean may be enjoyed in the depth of winter. Semi-tropical flowers and trees bloom in the open, and in February and early March—in what is, in fact, winter weather for those in less favoured parts—Penzance and its neighbourhood are surrounded by glorious spring flowers, the growing of which forms a very considerable industry.

London and our other big towns often get their first glimpse of coming spring in the narcissi and wallflowers grown around the shores of Mounts Bay, and packed off to the grim cold cities only a few hours away.

From: LEGEND LAND – 14 Illustrated Legends from Poldark Country

ISBN: 9781910882696

Pages: 103

Format: A5 Paperback and eBook (PDF & ePub)

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  1. TRELAWNY
  2. THE MERMAID OF ZENNOR
  3. THE STONE MEN OF ST. CLEER
  4. HOW ST. PIRAN CAME TO CORNWALL
  5. THE LOST CHILD OF ST. ALLEN
  6. THE GIANTS WHO BUILT THE MOUNT
  7. THE TASKS OF TREGEAGLE
  8. THE LADY OF LLYN-Y-FAN FACH
  9. DAVID AND HIS MOTHER
  10. THE VENGEANCE OF THE FAIRIES
  11. THE OLD WOMAN WHO FOOLED THE DEVIL
  12. THE WOMEN SOLDIERS OF FISHGUARD
  13. HOW BALA LAKE BEGAN
  14. THE FURRY DAY SONG

 

Available online in paperback and/or eBook formats:

Paperback at http://abelapublishing.com/legend-lands–14-legends-from-poldark-country_p31503131.htm

eBook (PDF & ePUB formats) at https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_LEGEND_LAND?id=9L5gDQAAQBAJ

GETTING THERE

  1. St. Michael’s Mount, also known as “the mount”, is open from February to October, usually from 10:30 to 16:00 each day. however, first check the mount’s webpage at  http://www.stmichaelsmount.co.uk/

To confirm the times the Mount will be open during your planned visit. Use this website to also check what times the causeway from Marazion to the mount will be open due to tidal activity.

 

To get there:

  • Take the Great Western Railway (GWR) service from London, Paddington via Exeter and Plymouth to Penzance and alight at Penzance.
  • By Bus
  • Walk to the bus station across the road from the train station near to the tourist information centre (TIC).
  • Take bus 2 or 39A to Marazion from stand E. Busses leave on average every half hour. The journey takes 25 – 30 minutes.

By Taxi

  • Taxi from Penzance station to St Michael’s Mount takes 10 – 15 minutes.

Per foot

  • The walk from Penzance to the mount is 2 miles, or 3.2km and, depending on how fast you walk, could take up to 1 hour to complete.

 

Next Land’s End (see “The Tasks Of Tregeagle” in the next legend) is approximately 10 miles from Penzance and can be visited by bus, taxi or organised coach tour.

legend land-14 Legends from Poldark Country

 

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