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One nice, warm sunny day, when it was too hot to stay inside the den among the rocks, the nice bears were all out in front, lying in the shade of the woods.

“Oh, my! How hot it is!” cried Dido, and he opened his mouth wide, and let his red tongue hang out, for animals, such as dogs and bears, cool themselves off that way. You must have seen your dog, when he had run fast, after a cat, perhaps, open his mouth and breathe fast, with his tongue hanging out.

“Let’s go swimming in the lake again!” cried Dido to his brothers.

“All right,” agreed Gruffo.

“We’ll all go,” said Mr. Bear. “Come along.”

So off through the woods walked the family of bears toward the cool, blue lake, high up in the mountains. Dido could hardly wait to get there, and as soon as he saw, through the trees, the sparkle of the water he began to run. He ran so fast that he stumbled over a stone, and fell down.

“Oh, Dido!” called his mother. “You must be more careful. You must not go so fast. Something will happen to you some day if you do not look where you are going.”

“I didn’t hurt myself that time, anyhow,” answered Dido, as he got up, and jumped into the lake. There he swam about, as did the father and mother bear, and the other two cubs. Dido splashed his brothers every time he came near them, but they did not mind, for he was such a cute little fellow and he meant no harm. Besides, it was so warm that the more water they had on them the better Gruffo and Muffo liked it.

“It makes me hungry to go in swimming,” said Mrs. Bear. “I am going off in the woods to look for some berries.”

“I’m coming, too,” said Dido. “For I am hungry myself.”

Soon Mrs. Bear found a bush on which were growing some big red berries. These she pulled off with her forepaws, which were, to her, almost like our hands are to us, and the mother bear filled her mouth with the fruit. Dido did the same, and soon he was not as hungry as he had been. Then along came Mr. Bear, with Gruffo and Muffo, and they, too, ate the red berries off the bushes.

All at once Mr. Bear stopped eating, and, lifting his nose up in the air, sniffed very hard two or three times.

“What is the matter?” asked Mrs. Bear quickly.

“I think I smell a man,” answered the papa bear. “See if you can smell anything.”

Mrs. Bear lifted her nose up in the air and she, also, sniffed. Bears, you know, as do most wild animals, use their noses as much as they do their eyes to tell when there is danger. And to wild animals a man, nearly always, means danger. If you were out in the woods, and could not see any one, you could not tell, just by smelling the air, whether some person was near you or not—that is, unless they had a lot of perfume on them, and then, if the wind was blowing toward you, why you might smell that.

But bears have much better noses for smelling than have we, and they can smell a man in the woods even if he has no cologne on him.

“Sniff! Sniff!” went Mr. Bear.

“Sniff! Sniff!” went Mrs. Bear.

“Yes, I can surely smell a man,” the papa bear said in a low voice. “It is the first time I have known them to come around here.”

“And so can I smell a man,” added Mrs. Bear. “We had better get away from here.”

Then the bears ran off through the woods to their den. For though big bears are very strong and can fight well, they would much rather run away from a man than fight him, unless they find they cannot get away. For when a man goes into the woods where there are bears he nearly always has a gun with him, and while bears know they are stronger than a man they also know that a gun is stronger than a dozen bears.

When Dido, with his brothers and father and mother, got back to the den in the rocks, the little bear cub saw that his father was worried about something. Mr. Bear walked up and down in front of the pile of rocks, sniffing the air, and looking on all sides.

“What is the matter, Papa?” asked Dido, in bear talk, of course.

“It’s that man I smelled in the woods,” said Mr. Bear. “I fear he may find our den.”

“Well, what if he does?” asked Dido.

“Then it would not be safe for us to stay here,” answered Mrs. Bear. “If men are coming into our woods it is time for us to go away.”

“What! go away from our nice den?” asked Gruffo. For though the den was only a hole in the rocks, with a pile of leaves in one corner for a bed, still, to the bears, it was as much a home as your house is to you.

“Yes, it would not be safe to stay while men are around,” said Mr. Bear. “That is the first time I have ever smelled them in our woods. Though a friend of mine, Mr. Lion, who lives farther down the mountain, said he has often seen men near his cave. Once some men on elephants chased him, but he got away.”

“Have you ever seen a man?” asked Dido of his father.

“Oh, yes, often, but always afar off. And the men did not see me.”

“What does a man look like?” asked Dido, for he had never seen any, though he had heard of them.

“A man is a queer creature,” said Mr. Bear. “He walks up on his hind feet, as we do sometimes, but when he walks on his four feet he can only go slowly, like a baby. Even you could run away from a man on his four feet, Dido.”

“How queer!” said the little bear.

“But don’t try it,” said Mrs. Bear quickly. “Keep away from men, Dido, for they might shoot you with one of their guns.”

“What else is a man like?” the little bear asked.

“Well, he has a skin that he can take off and put on again,” said Mr. Bear.

“Oh, how very funny!” cried Dido. “Take off his skin? I should think it would hurt!”

“It doesn’t seem to,” said the papa bear. “I don’t understand how they do it, but they do.”

Of course what Mr. Bear thought was skin was a man’s clothes, which he takes off and puts on again. But though bears are very wise and smart in their own way, they don’t know much about men, except to be afraid of them.

“I do not like it that men are coming up in our woods,” said Mr. Bear. “It means danger. So be careful, Dido, and you, too, Gruffo and Muffo, that you do not go too far away. Perhaps the man has come up here to set a trap to catch us.”

“What is a trap?” asked Dido.

“It is something dangerous, to catch bears,” his mother told him. “Some traps are made of iron, and they have sharp teeth in them that catch bears by the leg and hurt very much. Other traps are like a big box, made of logs. If you go in one of these box traps the door will shut and you can not get out.”

“What happens then?” asked Dido.

“Then the man comes and gets you.”

“And what does he do with you?” the little bear cub wanted to know.

“That I cannot say,” answered Mrs. Bear. “Perhaps your father knows.”

Mr. Bear shook his head.

“All I know,” he answered, “is that the man takes you away if he finds you in his trap. But where he takes you I do not know, for I was never caught, and I hope I never will be.”

“I hope so, too,” said Dido, and he sniffed the air to see if he could smell the man, but he could not.

For a number of days after that the bears did not go far from their den in the rocks. They were afraid the man might shoot them.

But, after a while, all the berries and sweet roots close by had been eaten, and the bears had to go farther off. Besides, they wanted some fish, and they must go to the lake or river to catch them. So after Mr. Bear had carefully sniffed the air, and had not smelled the man-smell, the bears started off through the woods again to get something to eat.

Dido ran here and there, sometimes on ahead and again he would stay behind, slipping up back of his brothers to tickle them. Oh, but Dido was a jolly little bear, always looking for fun.

The bears found some more red berries, and a few blue ones, and some sweet roots, and they also caught some fish, which made a good dinner for them. Then they went swimming in the lake again before going back to their den.

In the afternoon, when Gruffo was asleep in the shade, Dido went softly up to him, and poured a paw full of water in his brother’s ear.

“Wuff! Ouch! What’s that? Is it raining?” cried Gruffo, suddenly waking up. Then he saw that Dido had played the trick on him, and he ran after the little bear. But Dido climbed up a tree to get away, and he did it in such a funny way, his little short tail going around like a Fourth of July pinwheel, that Gruffo had to sit down and laugh.

“Oh, you are such a funny cut-up bear!” he said, laughing harder than ever, and when a bear laughs he can’t very well climb a tree.

“Come on down, I won’t do anything to you,” said Gruffo, after a while, so Dido came down. Then he turned somersaults on a pile of soft leaves. Next he stood on his hind legs, and began striking at a swinging branch of a tree with his front paws, as you have seen a kitten play with a cord of a window curtain.

Dido climed a tree to escape
But Dido climbed up a tree to get away.

 “Dido is getting to be a real cute little cub,” said Mrs. Bear.

Then, all of a sudden, Dido struck at the tree branch, but he did not hit it and he fell over backward.

“Look out!” cried Mr. Bear. “You’ll hurt yourself, Dido.”

“I didn’t hurt myself that time,” said the little bear, “for I fell on some soft, green moss.”

“Well, there will not always be moss for you to fall on,” his mother said. “So look out.”

One day, when Mr. Bear came back from a long trip in the woods, he brought some wild honey in his paws. And oh! how good it tasted to Dido and Gruffo and Muffo!

“Show me where the bee-tree is, Papa,” begged Dido. “I want to get some more honey.”

“It is too far away,” answered the papa bear. “Besides, I saw a man in the woods as I was getting the honey out of a hollow tree. It would not be safe for you to go near it when men are around.”

But the honey tasted so good to Dido that the little bear cub made up his mind that he simply must have more.

“I know what I’ll do,” he said to himself. “When none of the others are watching me I am going off by myself in the woods and look for a bee-tree to get some honey. I don’t believe there’s any danger.”

So about a week after this, one day, Dido saw his two brothers asleep outside the den. Mr. Bear had gone off to the lake, perhaps to catch some fish, and Mrs. Bear was in the den, stirring up the leaves that made the bed, so it would be softer to lie on.

“Now’s my chance,” thought Dido, in the way bears have of thinking. “I’ll just slip off in the woods by myself, and find a honey-tree. I’ll bring some honey home, too,” said Dido, for he was not a selfish little bear.

Walking softly, so as not to awaken his brothers, and so his mother, making the leaf-bed in the den, would not know what he was doing, away slipped Dido to the woods.

He shuffled along, now and then finding some red berries to eat, or a bit of sweet root, and every little while he would lift his nose up in the air, as he had seen his father do, and sniff to see if he could smell a man-smell.

“But I don’t smell any,” said Dido. “I guess it’s all right.”

Then, all at once, he felt a little wind blowing toward him, and on the breeze came the nicest smell.

“Oh, it’s honey!” cried Dido. “It’s honey! I have found the honey-tree! Oh, how glad I am!”

He hurried on through the woods, coming nearer and nearer to the honey smell all the while, until, after a bit, he saw in among the trees something square, like a box, made of little logs piled together. And inside the thing like a box was a pile of honey. Dido could see it and smell it. But he did not rush up in a great hurry.

“That doesn’t look like the honey-tree father told about,” the little bear cub thought. “He said he had to climb a tree. This honey is low down. Still it is honey, so this must be a honey-tree, and if it is low down so much the better for me. I will not have to climb.”

Dido sniffed the air again. He wanted to see if there was a man-smell about. But all he could smell was the honey.

“Oh, I guess it’s all right,” said the bear cub. “I’m so hungry for that honey I can’t wait! Here I go!”

Dido fairly ran into the box and began to eat the honey on the floor of it. But, no sooner had he taken a bite, than suddenly a queer thing happened.

Bang! went something behind Dido, and when he looked around he saw that the box was shut tight. A sliding door had fallen down and poor Dido was a prisoner……

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From: “Dido the Dancing Bear”

ISBN: 9788835390220

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://bit.ly/2xmFe8a

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ILLUSTRATED BY MILO WINTER

This book is for all little boys and girls who love animals and is the second DOCTOR RABBIT book in the series.

Our story starts with Doctor Rabbit receiving a call for a home visit. He collects his bag, puts on his top hat and just as he steps out his front door he hears a rustle and sees a shape in the bushes. But who could that be?

Ki-Yi Coyote has just moved into the area and his larder is empty. He sees Doctor Rabbit coming out of his house and the game is afoot, for Coyotes do like the taste of Rabbit.

Is Doctor Rabbit able to avoid being caught by Ki-Yi Coyote and attend his patient? Will Doctor Rabbit be able to unite the residents and formulate a plan to drive Ki-Yi out of the woods or are they too scared to act?

To find out what happens to Ki-Yi Coyote and Doctor Rabbit, you will have to download this lovely little ebook.

This volume is sure to keep you and your young ones enchanted for hours, if only because of it’s quality and it will keep young ones engaged for hours. They will have you coming back to it for more time and again.

ISBN: 9788828372141

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/thomas-c-hinkle/doctor-rabbit-and-ki-yi-coyote/

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KEYWORDS/TAGS: fairy tales, folklore, myths, legends, children’s stories, childrens stories, bygone era, fairydom, fairy kingdom, ethereal, fairy land, classic stories, children’s bedtime stories, happy place, happiness, laughter, Doctor Rabbit, Ki-Yi Coyote, Kiyi, Phone Call, Fear, Holes, Trees, Doctoring, Billy Rabbit, Chase, Scare, Jack Rabbit, Escape, Keep Watch, Chatty Squirrel, Fooling, Scheme, Little Creatures, Woods, Excitement, Talk, Big Dog, Yappy, Old Uncle Owl, Good, Advice, Strange, Hiding Place, Catch, Happy, drive out, Again

JUST ADDED 4 sets of old and forgotten images to our CLASSIC ILLUSTRATIONS archive which can be viewed at https://shoptly.com/fairytaleimages

 

The NEW Additions are:

 

  1. 47 Images and 20 illustrated capitals in Black and White by John D Batten from MORE CELTIC FAIRY TALES compiled by Joseph Jacobs.

Black and white illustrations are ideal for printing off and giving to children to colour in.

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://shoptly.com/i/wcf

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  1. 11 Classic Fairy Tale Illustrations by ALICEA POLSON from WONDERWINGS AND OTHER STORIES by Edith Howes – 3 in colour plus a complimentary image of the original cover.

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://shoptly.com/i/wkm

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  1. 6 Classic Children’s Illustrations in colour by GEORGE W. HOOD from THE NORWEGIAN BOOK OF FAIRY TALES compiled and retold by Clara Stroebe

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://shoptly.com/i/wod

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  1. 8 Classic Children’s Illustrations by GEORGE W. HOOD from The Book of Swedish Fairy Tales compiled and retold by Clara Stroebe

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://shoptly.com/i/wok

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Just added to our growing archive of classic children’s illustrations:

 

31 Classic Fairy Tale Illustrations from WHITE ELEPHANT TALES OF INDIA plus 8 story header illustrations.

Download link: https://shoptly.com/i/wk6

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Also Two sets of illustrations from Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit –

 

42 Classic Fairy Tale Illustrations from TOLD BY UNCLE REMUS ILLUSTRATED BY A. B. FROST, J. M. CONDE AND FRANK UERBECK GROSSET & DUNLAP

Download Link: https://shoptly.com/i/wkd

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61 Classic Fairy Tale Illustrations by an Unknown Artist from UNCLE REMIS AND BRER RABBIT

Download Link: https://shoptly.com/i/wkj

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To view all 59 sets of images, click on https://shoptly.com/fairytaleimages – includes sets from Peter Rabbit & friends by Beatrix Potter

Over 1500 classic illustrations from children’s fairy tales and folklore in BnW and colour, including from the Tales of Peter Rabbit & Friends – https://shoptly.com/fairytaleimages

This week’s latest releases are:

 

LEGEND LAND Vol. 2 – 15 ancient legends from England’s West country of Devon & Cornwall

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WONDER TALES FROM SCOTTISH MYTH AND LEGEND – 16 Wonder tales from Scottish Lore

JESSIE MACRAE AND THE GILLIE DHU 17400The Coming of the BrideWTOSNAL-front_Cover_A5_Centered

THE ELVES OF MOUNT FERN – The Adventures of elves, fairies and pixies of Mount Fern, Unfortunately nothing to do with the Elves and Fairies of Fern Gully, but very similar in nature.

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BROWNIES AND BOGLES –  Contains Background and Insights to the Little People of Lore and Legend.

43 GoodbyeBAB_front_Cover_A5_CenteredTHE LITTLE NECK IN THE SWEDISH RIVERword Cloud

COMING SOON – MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF ALL NATIONS – 25 illustrated myths, legends and stories for children. 25 famous stories from Greek, German, English, Spanish Scandinavian, Danish, French, Russian, Bohemian, Italian and other sources. These stories are brought to life by 24 full colour plates

canvasMYTHS AND LEGENDS of all nations

All eBooks can be reviewed and downloaded from https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/search

We have now passed  the 300 mark of ebooks for children and young adults!

Have a look at our latest series of animal story books for children which can be found by clicking on this link: https://goo.gl/D8r1UA

 

PETER RABBIT AND HIS FRIENDS – Written and illustrated by BEATRIX POTTER

The Tale Of Peter Rabbit – Book 1

The Tale Of Squirrel Nutkin – Book 2

The Tailor Of Gloucester – Book 3

The Tale Of Benjamin Bunny – Book 4

The Tale Of Two Bad Mice – Book 5

The Tale Of Mrs Tiggy-Winkle – Book 6

Tale Of The Pie And The Patty-Pan – Book 7

The Tales Of Mr. Jeremy Fisher – Book 8

The Story Of A Fierce, Bad Rabbit – Book 9

The Story Of Miss Moppet – Book 10

The Story Of Tom Kitten – Book 11

The Tale Of Jemima Puddle-Duck – Book 12

The Tale Of Samuel Whiskers – Book 13

The Tale Of The Flopsy Bunnies  Book 14

The Tale Of Johnny Town-Mouse  – Book 21

 

AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE TALES OF PETER RABBIT – 15 fully illustrated Beatrix Potter books in one volume. ALL OF THE ABOVE in 1 ebook

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UNCLE REMUS stories

Told By Uncle Remus

Uncle Remus And Brer Rabbit

WRITTEN AND ILLUSTRATED BY KATHERINE PYLE
Three Little Kittens
The Six Little Ducklings

DOCTOR RABBIT STORIES
Doctor Rabbit And Tom Wildcat
Doctor Rabbit And Brushtail The Fox

WRITTEN BY GEORGE E. WALSH
Buster The Big Brown Bear
Bumper The White Rabbit
Washer The Raccoon

OTHER ANIMAL STORY BOOKS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

THE ADVENTURES OF GRANDFATHER FROG – 23 Froggy Bedtime Tales

THE ANIMAL STORY BOOK – 63 illustrated stories

THE JUNGLE BOOK – 16 illustrated tales from the Seoni Jungle of Madhya Pradesh, India

THE SECOND JUNGLE BOOK – a further 16 illustrated tales of Mowgli, Ka, Baheera, Sheer Khan and the other animals of the Seoni Jungle.

JUST SO STORIES – 12 illustrated Children’s Stories of how things came to be

AUSTRALIAN LEGENDARY TALES – 31 Children’s Aboriginal Stories from the Outback

 

Click on this link to find and download these books: https://goo.gl/D8r1UA

By Thomas Clark Hinkle

 

“Doctor Rabbit and Tom Wildcat”, written by Thomas Clark Hinkle (1876-1949) is an illustrated children’s story in the style of Beatrix Potter’s “Peter Rabbit and Friends” series.

In the middle of the night, Tom Wildcat knocks on Doctor Rabbit’s door. Grumbling he wakes up and opens his window to see who it is. He is not pleased to see Tom Wildcat and less keener to open his, fearful of the consequences. Nevertheless he treats Tom Wildcat.

What do you want at my house this time o_ night

But that isn’t the end of Doctor Rabbit’s dealings with Tom Wildcat. He overhears Tom say he is planning to catch and eat his friend, the innocent Jack Rabbit. But what could he do about it?

 

He sat in his rocking chair and thought and thought until he had come up with a plan.

When he was sure the “coast was clear” he snuck out and began to make his way to where Jack Rabbit took his naps. But did he get there in time to warn him?

Mr. Jack Rabbit ... came very near being caught

And what of his other patients? What is wrong with O Possum and what secret did Tom Wildcat discover?

 

So sit back with a steamy beverage and be prepared to be entertained for many-an-hour with this forgotten children’s story. If and when you come to pick up the story where you left it, don’t be surprised if you find a younger reader is now engrossed in the book and is reluctant to let it go.

 

10% of the net sale will be donated to charities by the publisher.

 

ISBN: 9788828353928

FORMATS: Kindle, ePub & PDF

PRICE: US$1.99 which converts to approx. GBP£1.50, €1.70, A$2.67, NZ$2.91, ZAR26.65, INR136.95, CNY13.16 at today’s exchange rates

 

For more information or to download, go to: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/thomas-clark-hinkle/doctor-rabbit-and-tom-wildcat-an-illustrated-story-in-the-style-of-peter-rabbit-and-friends/

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June’s sales figures are now in. Halfway through the month we saw how the Football world cup had taken some of the focus off Hawaii, but a late rally saw Hawaiian & Polynesian themed folktale reassert themselves.

Our top four bestselling books for June were:

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JUST SO STORIES – 12 illustrated Children’s Stories of how things came to be

ISBN: 9788828325000

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/rudyard-kipling/just-so-stories-12-illustrated-childrens-stories-of-how-things-came-to-be/

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MAORI FOLKLORE – 23 Maori Myths and Legends

ISBN: 9788822806758

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/sir-george-grey/maori-folklore-or-the-ancient-traditional-history-of-the-new-zealanders/

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OLD PETER’S RUSSIAN TALES – 20 illustrated Russian Children’s Stories

ISBN: 9788827560990

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/old-peters-russian-tales-20-illustrated-russian-childrens-stories/

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HAWAIIAN FOLK TALES – 34 Hawaiian folk and fairy tales

ISBN: 9788822801876

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/hawaiian-folk-tales-34-hawaiian-folk-and-fairy-tales/

 

Old Indian Legends, Wonderwings and Other Fairy Stories, Wonder Tales from Baltic Wizards and The Norwegian Book of Fairy Tales did their best to out-perform each other to take fifth spot.

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The Cat Who became Head Forrester  - Baba Indaba Childrens Stories # 89

The Cat Who became Head Forrester – Baba Indaba Childrens Stories # 89

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 89

In Issue 89 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of THE CAT WHO BECAME HEAD-FORESTER. One day a forester sews his one-eyed, one eared cat into a hessian sack and takes it into the forest and throws it away. The cat escapes and goes on to achieve great things. Download and read this story to find out just what happened after that.

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN’S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_CAT_WHO_BECAME_HEAD_FORRESTER_A_R?id=SL8aDAAAQBAJ