You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Eastern European Folklore’ category.

This week’s latest releases are:

 

LEGEND LAND Vol. 2 – 15 ancient legends from England’s West country of Devon & Cornwall

LLv2-Cover-A5-Centered THE CHURCH THE DEVIL STOLE Word Cloud

WONDER TALES FROM SCOTTISH MYTH AND LEGEND – 16 Wonder tales from Scottish Lore

JESSIE MACRAE AND THE GILLIE DHU 17400The Coming of the BrideWTOSNAL-front_Cover_A5_Centered

THE ELVES OF MOUNT FERN – The Adventures of elves, fairies and pixies of Mount Fern, Unfortunately nothing to do with the Elves and Fairies of Fern Gully, but very similar in nature.

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BROWNIES AND BOGLES –  Contains Background and Insights to the Little People of Lore and Legend.

43 GoodbyeBAB_front_Cover_A5_CenteredTHE LITTLE NECK IN THE SWEDISH RIVERword Cloud

COMING SOON – MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF ALL NATIONS – 25 illustrated myths, legends and stories for children. 25 famous stories from Greek, German, English, Spanish Scandinavian, Danish, French, Russian, Bohemian, Italian and other sources. These stories are brought to life by 24 full colour plates

canvasMYTHS AND LEGENDS of all nations

All eBooks can be reviewed and downloaded from https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/search

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We have created a dedicated area for the digitised illustrated works of Andrew Lang. In the main these consist of the Many Coloured Fairy Books plus his other illustrated works.

 

Of note are the Arabian Nights Entertainments – containing 32 tales from the 1001 Arabian Nights. These were selected and compiled by Andrew Lang and detail heroic figures such as Aladdin, Ali Baba, Sinbad, and others, whose luck and ingenuity carry them through perilous adventures.

 

Like the Grimm brothers, Andrew Lang collected fairytales from around the world. Where necessary he and his wife translated and retold them in English.

 

The publisher Longmans, Green and company, now a part of the Pearson publishing empire, teamed Lang up with illustrator H. J. Ford, and what a partnership it was. It was so good that during the late Victorian era the works by Andrew Lang outsold those created by the Grimms.

 

So, you’re invited to download and enjoy.

 

All eBooks only US1.99 or about £1.50, €1.70, A$2.69, NZ$2.93, INR137.01, ZAR26.99 depending on the rates of exchange.

URL/LINK: https://the-many-colored-fairy-books-of-andrew-lang.stores.streetlib.com/en/

 

June’s sales figures are now in. Halfway through the month we saw how the Football world cup had taken some of the focus off Hawaii, but a late rally saw Hawaiian & Polynesian themed folktale reassert themselves.

Our top four bestselling books for June were:

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JUST SO STORIES – 12 illustrated Children’s Stories of how things came to be

ISBN: 9788828325000

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/rudyard-kipling/just-so-stories-12-illustrated-childrens-stories-of-how-things-came-to-be/

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MAORI FOLKLORE – 23 Maori Myths and Legends

ISBN: 9788822806758

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/sir-george-grey/maori-folklore-or-the-ancient-traditional-history-of-the-new-zealanders/

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OLD PETER’S RUSSIAN TALES – 20 illustrated Russian Children’s Stories

ISBN: 9788827560990

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/old-peters-russian-tales-20-illustrated-russian-childrens-stories/

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HAWAIIAN FOLK TALES – 34 Hawaiian folk and fairy tales

ISBN: 9788822801876

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/hawaiian-folk-tales-34-hawaiian-folk-and-fairy-tales/

 

Old Indian Legends, Wonderwings and Other Fairy Stories, Wonder Tales from Baltic Wizards and The Norwegian Book of Fairy Tales did their best to out-perform each other to take fifth spot.

OIL-Cover WWaOS-Front-Cover WTBW_Front_Cover_A5_Centered Norwegian-Fairy-Book-Cover

 

THERE lived in Constantinople an old Hodja, a learned man, who had a son. The boy followed in his father’s footsteps, went every day to the Mosque Aya Sofia, seated himself in a secluded spot, to the left of the pillar bearing the impress of the Conqueror’s hand, and engaged in the study of the Koran. Daily he might be seen seated, swaying his body to and fro, and reciting to himself the verses of the Holy Book.

The dearest wish of a Mohammedan theological student is to be able to recite the entire Koran by heart. Many years are spent in memorizing the Holy Book, which must be recited with a prescribed cantillation, and in acquiring a rhythmical movement of the body which accompanies the chant.

When Abdul, for that was the young man’s name, had reached his nineteenth year, he had, by the most assiduous study, finally succeeded in mastering three-fourths of the Koran. At this achievement his pride rose, his ambition was fired, and he determined to become a great man.

The day that he reached this decision he did not go to the Mosque, but stopped at home, in his father’s house, and sat staring at the fire burning in the grate. Several times the father asked:
“My son, what do you see in the fire?”
And each time the son answered:
“Nothing, father.”
He was very young; he could not see.
Finally, the young man picked up courage and gave expression to his thoughts.
“Father,” he said, “I wish to become a great man.”
“That is very easy,” said the father.
“And to be a great man,” continued the son, “I must first go to Mecca.” For no Mohammedan priest or theologian, or even layman, has fulfilled all of the cardinal precepts of his faith unless he has made the pilgrimage to the Holy City.

To his son’s last observation the father blandly replied: “It is very easy to go to Mecca.”

“How, easy?” asked the son. “On the contrary, it is very difficult; for the journey is costly, and I have no money.”

“Listen, my son,” said the father. “You must become a scribe, the writer of the thoughts of your brethren, and your fortune is made.”

“But I have not even the implements necessary for a scribe,” said the son.

“All that can be easily arranged,” said the father; “your grandfather had an ink-horn; I will give it you; I will buy you some writing-paper, and we will get you a box to sit in; all that you need to do is to sit still, look wise and your fortune is made.”

And indeed the advice was good. For letter-writing is an art which only the few possess. The ability to write by no means carries with it the ability to compose. Epistolary genius is rare.

Abdul was much rejoiced at the counsel that had been given him, and lost no time in carrying out the plan. He took his grandfather’s ink-horn, the paper his father bought, got himself a box and began his career as a scribe.

Abdul was a child, he knew nothing, but deeming himself wise he sought to surpass the counsel of his father.

“To look wise,” he said, “is not sufficient; I must have some other attraction.”

And after much thought he hit upon the following idea. Over his box he painted a legend: “The wisdom of man is greater than the wisdom of woman.” People thought the sign very clever, customers came, the young Hodja took in many piasters and he was correspondingly happy.

This sign one day attracted the eyes and mind of a Hanoum (Turkish lady). Seeing that Abdul was a manly youth, she went to him and said:

“Hodja, I have a difficult letter to write. I have heard that thou art very wise, so I have come to thee. To write the letter thou wilt need all thy wit. Moreover, the letter is a long one, and I cannot stand here while it is being written. Come to my Konak (house) at three this afternoon, and we will write the letter.”

The Hodja was overcome with admiration for his fair client, and surprised at the invitation. He was enchanted, his heart beat wildly, and so great was his agitation that his reply of acquiescence was scarcely audible.

The invitation had more than the charm of novelty to make it attractive. He had never talked with a woman outside of his own family circle. To be admitted to a lady’s house was in itself an adventure.

Long before the appointed time, the young Hodja—impetuous youth—gathered together his reeds, ink, and sand. With feverish step he wended his way to the house. Lattices covered the windows, a high wall surrounded the garden, and a ponderous gate barred the entrance. Thrice he raised the massive knocker.

“Who is there?” called a voice from within.

“The scribe,” was the reply.

“It is well,” said the porter; the gate was unbarred, and the Hodja permitted to enter. Directly he was ushered into the apartment of his fair client.

The lady welcomed him cordially.

“Ah! Hodja Effendi, I am glad to see you; pray sit down.”

The Hodja nervously pulled out his writing-implements.

“Do not be in such a hurry,” said the lady. “Refresh yourself; take a cup of coffee, smoke a cigarette, and we will write the letter afterwards.”

So he lit a cigarette, drank a cup of coffee, and they fell to talking. Time flew; the minutes seemed like seconds, and the hours were as minutes. While they were thus enjoying themselves there suddenly came a heavy knock at the gate.

“It is my husband, the Pasha,” cried the lady. “What shall I do? If he finds you here, he will kill you! I am so frightened.”

The Hodja was frightened too. Again there came a knock at the gate.

“I have it,” and taking Abdul by the arm, she said, “you must get into the box,” indicating a large chest in the room. “Quick, quick, if you prize your life utter not a word, and Inshallah I will save you.”

Abdul now, too late, saw his folly. It was his want of experience; but driven by the sense of danger, he entered the chest; the lady locked it and took the key.

A moment afterwards the Pasha came in.

“I am very tired,” he said; “bring me coffee and a chibook.”

“Good evening, Pasha Effendi,” said the lady. “Sit down. I have something to tell you.”

“Bah!” said the Pasha; “I want none of your woman’s talk; ‘the hair of woman is long, and her wits are short,’ says the proverb. Bring me my pipe.”

“But, Pasha Effendi,” said the lady, “I have had an adventure to-day.”

“Bah!” said the Pasha; “what adventure can a woman have—forgot to paint your eyebrows or color your nails, I suppose.”

“No, Pasha Effendi. Be patient, and I will tell you. I went out to-day to write a letter.”

“A letter?” said the Pasha; “to whom would you write a letter?”

“Be patient,” she said, “and I will tell you my story. So I came to the box of a young scribe with beautiful eyes.”

“A young man with beautiful eyes,” shouted the Pasha. “Where is he? I’ll kill him!” and he drew his sword.

The Hodja in the chest heard every word and trembled in every limb.

“Be patient, Pasha Effendi; I said I had an adventure, and you did not believe me. I told the young man that the letter was long, and I could not stand in the street to write it. So I asked him to come and see me this afternoon.”

“Here? to this house?” thundered the Pasha.

“Yes, Pasha Effendi,” said the lady. “So the Hodja came here, and I gave him coffee and a cigarette, and we talked, and the minutes seemed like seconds, and the hours were as minutes. All at once came your knock at the gate, and I said to the Hodja, ‘That is the Pasha; and if he finds you here, he will kill you.'”

“And I will kill him,” screamed the Pasha, “where is he?”

“Be patient, Pasha Effendi,” said the lady, “and I will tell you. When you knocked a second time, I suddenly thought of the chest, and I put the Hodja in.”

“Let me at him!” screamed the Pasha. “I’ll cut off his head!”

“O Pasha,” she said, “what a hurry you are in to slay this comely youth. He is your prey; he cannot escape you. The youth is not only in the box, but it is locked, and the key is in my pocket. Here it is.”

The lady walked over to the Pasha, stretched out her hand and gave him the key.
As he took it, she said:

“Philopena!”

“Bah!” said the Pasha, in disgust. He threw the key on the floor and left the harem, slamming the door behind him.

After he had gone, the lady took up the key, unlocked the door, and let out the trembling Hodja.

“Go now, Hodja, to your box,” she said. “Take down your sign and write instead: ‘The wit of woman is twofold the wit of man,’ for I am a woman, and in one day I have fooled two men.”
====================
From TOLD IN THE COFFEE HOUSE – 29 Turkish and Islamic Folk Tales

ISBN: 9788828339441

Formats: Kindle, ePUB, PDF

Price: US$1.99 +/- £1.50, €1.71, A$2.68, NZ$2.89, INR135.08, ZAR26.76

URL: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/told-in-the-coffee-house-29-turkish-and-islamic-folk-tales/

The Cat Who became Head Forrester  - Baba Indaba Childrens Stories # 89

The Cat Who became Head Forrester – Baba Indaba Childrens Stories # 89

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 89

In Issue 89 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of THE CAT WHO BECAME HEAD-FORESTER. One day a forester sews his one-eyed, one eared cat into a hessian sack and takes it into the forest and throws it away. The cat escapes and goes on to achieve great things. Download and read this story to find out just what happened after that.

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN’S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_CAT_WHO_BECAME_HEAD_FORRESTER_A_R?id=SL8aDAAAQBAJ

Almost a year ago I started a project to keep alive and bring to the world those old and forgotten children’s stories as individual stories. No longer will you have to buy a whole book of stories to have access to just one story.

 

To make it more interesting, I created a fictional persona to narrate the stories based on a tribal storyteller, in this case a Zulu tribal storyteller. His name is Baba Indaba, pronounced Baaba Indaaba, which means “Father of Stories” and he lived in KwaZulu-Natal during the Victorian era. A free downloadable description of Baba Indaba can be found on Google Play and Google Books.

 

As at today the first 260 stories have been loaded in PDF and ePUB formats. Each story sells for US$0.25 – or you can buy 4 for US$1.00

The UK price is £0.20 or 4 for £0.80. For all other countries, Google works out what the equivalent price in your country is.

At least 5 new stories will be added to this collection every week.

 

PLEASE LIKE and SHARE this with your FB friends especially those who are teachers or have children of their own.

 

Below you will find a list of all 260 stories to date listed by the region they originated in.

The URL/link to review the stories, and/or to buy, is https://goo.gl/J5TX98

 

Each story also includes LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE BABA INDABA STORIES as well as a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” educational section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. Our HINT is: use Google maps.

 

AFRICA

Book 01 – The Stars and The Road of Stars

Book 02 – Why the Hare has a Split Nose

Book 06 – Anansi and the Lion

Book 07 – Two Anansi Stories

Book 10 – The Lost message

Book 111 A STORY ABOUT A MAIDEN AND A PUMPKIN

Book 122 The Story of OSIRIS

Book 16 – THE GIRL OF THE EARLY RACE WHO MADE STARS

Book 19 – THE STORY ABOUT A BEAUTIFUL MAIDEN

Book 220 WHY THE HONEY BADGER IS SO KEEN ON HONEY

Book 25 –  Miss Salt Miss Pepper

Book 29 – Why the Whitecrow Never Speaks

Book 43 – Why A Bushman Throws Earth Into the Air

Book 46 – Two Bushmen Tales – HOW A SNAKE ANNOUNCES A DEATH IN THE FAMILY & THE RESURRECTION OF THE OSTRICH

Book 69 A LION’S STORY

Book 83 The Giant and the Cause of Thunder

 

AESOP’s FABLES – Rewritten for Children

Book 08 – The Tortoise and the Ducks

Book 117 TWO AESOPS FABLES – The Astrologer & The Fox and the Pheasants

Book 127 A Cat and Mouse in Partnership

Book 21 – How the Turtle Saved his Own Life

Book 26 –  The Wolf and the Kid

Book 30 – The Old Lion and the Jackal

Book 37 – A Cocks Breakfast

Book 28 – THE EAGLE AND THE CROW

Book 61 – Horse and Turtle

Book 62  THE JACKAL AND THE HYENA

Book 78 Two Aesops Fables

Book 90 BELLING THE CAT

 

AUSTRALASIAN – Aboriginal, Maori, Polynesian

Book 221 The Story of Hine Moa

Book 52 – How the Fish got into Water

Book 82 The Story of Ahuula

 

NORTH AMERICAS – American Indian, Americana, Alaska & Hawaii

Book 114 The Giant Dog

Book 119 UNKTOMI AND THE ARROWHEADS

Book 18 – The Star Maiden

Book 182 BOKWEWA, THE HUMPBACK

Book 191 WUNZH – THE FATHER OF INDIAN CORN

Book 198 THE RETURN OF THE DEAD WIFE

Book 200 RIP VAN WINKLE

Book 201 THE WONDERFUL BASKET

Book 204 GROWING-UP-LIKE-ONE-WHO-HAS-A-GRANDMOTHER

Book 207 THE STORY OF DJUN

Book 208 BLACKSKIN

Book 212 LAND-OTTER THE INDIAN

Book 217 THE CHIEF’S DAUGHTER

Book 238 THE ADVENTURES OF FIRE-DRILL’S SON

Book 245 The Loot of Loma – American Indian

Book 31 – Two American Indian Stories – A Bashful Courtship & Why The Birch-Tree Wears Slashes In It’s Bark

Book 32 – A BET BETWEEN THE COOYOKO AND THE FOX

Book 42 – A Dinner and its Consequences

Book 60  A HOPI RAID ON A NAVAHO DANCE

Book 63  Journies to the Skeleton House

Book 64  A KATCINA RACE CONTEST BETWEEN THE WµLPI AND THE ORAÖBI

Book 67 A Legend of Manabozho

Book 70 A LITTLE BRAVE AND THE MEDICINE WOMAN

 

BRITISH – English, Welsh, Scots & Irish

Book 09 – The Three Sillies

Book 101 A Voyage to Lilliput

Book 102 Black Brown and Gray

Book 104 Lazy Jack

Book 109 Nansi Llwyd and the Dog of Darkness

Book 112 THE Milk White Doo and a poem

Book 118 Tom Tit Tot

Book 12 – The Tale of the Hoodie

Book 123 ‘HAME, HAME, HAME, WHERE I FAIN WAD BE’

Book 124 MORE FAITHFUL THAN FAVOURED

Book 130 A NIGHT IN THE KITCHEN (HCA)

Book 132 BEOWULF

Book 133 Two Medieval Stories

Book 134 CHILDE HORN

Book 135 GUY OF WARWICK

Book 136 PRESTER JOHN

Book 137 Cherry

Book 146 THE PHYNODDERREE – Isle of Man

Book 153 A STRANGE TIGER

Book 151 A Rats Tale

Book 155 A White Trout

Book 158 LITTLE THUMB

Book 159 THE MASTER CAT

Book 161 ADVENTURES OF GILLA NA CHRECK AN GOUR

Book 165 ALL CHANGE

Book 166 BINNORIE

Book 168 Birth of Fin MacCumhail

Book 170 BLACK STAIRS ON FIRE

Book 171 Two Ghostly Tales

Book 172 AN BRAON SUAN OR

Book 178 DAY-DREAMING

Book 179 EARL MARs DAUGHTER

Book 183 CAUTH MORRISY LOOKING FOR SERVICE

Book 199 YOUNG AMAZON SNELL

Book 202 AN OLD-WORLD GHOST

Book 203 THE GENTLEMAN HIGHWAYMAN

Book 205 BLIND JACK OF KNARESBOROUGH

Book 206 BLIND JACK – More Adventures

Book 213 THE DISINHERITING OF A SON

Book 247 MR. VINEGAR

Book 250 THE SHEPHERD OF LAUDERDALE

Book 257 – THE CHURCH THE DEVIL STOLE & THE PARSON AND THE CLERK – Two Co

Book 258 – Two Cornish Legends – The Weaver Of Dean Combe And  The Demon Who Helped Drake

Book 259 – Two Cornish Legends – The Samson Of Tavistock And The Midnight Hunter Of The Moor

Book 260 – Two Cornish Legends – The Piskie’s Funeral and The Lost Land of Lyonesse

Book 33 – A Mouthful of Silence

Book 45 – Two Welsh Fables – The Fable Of Gwrgan Farfdrwch & The Story Of The Pig-Trough

Book 54  A Ghostly Rehearsal

Book 57  A Good Action

Book 65  A LEGEND OF KNOCKMANY

Book 66 The Legend of Lough Mask

Book 71 A LOST PARADISE

Book 75 A Pottle O’ Brains

Book 76 A Phantom Funeral

Book 77 A Puzzle

Book 87 TWO WELSH FABLES – A Strange Otter & Melangell’s Lambs

Book 91 Cap O Rushes

Book 92 The Legend of Beth Gellert

Book 93 DAME PRIDGETT AND THE FAIRIES

 

CENTRAL AMERICA – Caribbean, Mexican, Pre-Columbian, Atlantean

Book 138 PRINCESS BLUEGREEN OF THE SEVEN CITIES

Book 173 Bimini and the Fountain of Youth

Book 34 – The Maya Creation Story

Book 38 – The Creation Story of the Mixtecs

Book 48 – The Death Of Tupac King of the Inca

Book 51 – THE STORY OF NEZAHUALPILLI KING OF TEXCOCO

Book 56  The Lost Island

Book 72 The MYTH OF MANCO CCAPAC INCA

Book 73 The Rise and Fall of the Toltec Empire

Book 74 ZLATOVLASKA THE GOLDEN-HAIRED

Book 80 The Fugitive Prince

 

EUROPE – Eastern, Western & Scandinavia

Book 04 – The Watchmaker

Book 100 HANSEL AND GRETTEL

Book 105 MASTER AND PUPIL

Book 107 MOTHER HOLLE

book 115 A Very Naughty Boy

book 120 Vasilica The Brave

Book 121 ANDROCLES AND THE LION

Book 125 ‘TOM’ AN ADVENTURE IN THE LIFE OF A BEAR IN PARIS

Book 126 A (NOTHER) STORY OF A FROG

Book 139 Twopence Halfpenny – Gypsy

Book 143 THE JUDGMENT OF THE FLOWERS – Spain

Book 149 A PACK OF RAGAMUFFINS

Book 150 IN HONOUR OF A RAVEN

Book 152 FELICIA AND THE POT OF PINKS

Book 156 THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER or CINDERELLA

Book 157 THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOODS

Book 160 BLUE BEARD

Book 162 BEASTS BESIEGED

Book 163 AINO’S FATE

Book 164 BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Book 167 ALLERLEIRAUH or THE MANY-FURRED CREATURE

Book 169 ALPHEGE OR THE GREEN MONKEY

Book 174 BLOCKHEAD-HANS

Book 175 CANNETELLA (GFB)

Book 176 CHARCOAL NILS AND THE TROLL-WOMAN

Book 177 DAPPLEGRIM

Book 180 EMELYAN THE FOOL

Book 181 AN IMPOSSIBLE ENCHANTMENT (GFB)

Book 184 DOGS OVER THE WATER

Book 186 Aschenputtel

Book 187 BOYISLAV YOUNGEST OF TWELVE

Book 188 GAZELLE the TORTOISE

Book 189 HEART OF ICE

Book 190 ILMARINEN FORGES THE SAMPO

Book 192 VASSILISSA THE CUNNING AND THE TSAR OF THE SEA

Book 193 VIRGILIUS THE SORCERER (VFB)

Book 194 WAINAMOINEN AND YOUKAHAINEN

Book 195 YELENA THE WISE

Book 196 THE DROWNED BUCCANEER

Book 209 THE PETS OF AURORE DUPIN

Book 210 AURORE DUPIN AT PLAY

Book 211 HOW AURORE DUPIN LEARNs TO RIDE

Book 214 THE SIEGE OF RHODES

Book 216 BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Book 218 THE BOYHOOD OF LEONARDO

Book 219 THE ADVENTURES OF A SPANISH NUN

Book 154 A THE STORY OF THREE WONDERFUL BEGGARS

Book 237 Pandoras Box

Book 24 – Salt – A Baba Yaga story

Book 243 AMYS AND AMYLE (Red Romance Book)

Book 246 CINDERELLA or the Little Glass Slipper

Book 251 DONKEY SKIN

Book 248 THree princesses of whiteland (Norway)

Book 249 Famine Among the Gnomes – Norse

Book 36 – A Clever Lass

Book 41 – The  Wind Rider

Book 39 – The Wolves Skoll and Hati

Book 44 – A Dozen At A Blow

Book 55  A GIFT FROM FRIGGA

Book 53 A French Puck

Book 59  A Gullible World

Book 85 Baba Yaga and the Girl with a Kind Heart

Book 86 A Story About a Darning Needle

Book 88 A Tale of Tontawald

Book 89 THE CAT WHO BECAME HEAD-FORESTER

Book 95 Gertrudes Bird

Book 96 A VISITOR FROM PARADISE

Book 98 FIN MacCUMHAIL and the KNIGHT of the FULL AXE

Book 99 GENTLE DORA

 

FAIRY STORIES

Book 103 HOW ETHNE LEFT THE LAND OF THE FAIRIES

Book 108 Minnikin

Book 113 The Fairy Frog

Book 128 A FAIRY’S BLUNDER

Book 140 The Fairy Child

Book 141 The Fairy Cure

Book 142 The Fairy Nurse

Book 144 The Kite That Went to the Moon

Book 145 The Pen Fairy

Book 147 The Rubber Fairy

Book 148 Twelfth Night Fairy

Book 185 FAIRER-THAN-A-FAIRY

Book 232 Twelve Fairy Stories Bumper edition

Book 234 Tinyboy and Other Stories

Book 235 The Leaf Fairy and Other Stories

Book 236 The Rain Fairy and Other Stories

Book 252 THE ELF MAIDEN

Book 49 –  A Fairy Borrowing

Book 50 – A Fairy Dog

Book 94 FAIRY TRANSPORTATION

 

FAR EAST – Burma, China, Japan

Book 106 – A TRADITIONAL PHYSICIAN CALLED JIVAKA

Book 11 – The Moon that Shone on the Porcelain Pagoda

Book 110 The Sparrow with the Slit Tongue

Book 116 OF THE MAIDEN SSUWARANDARI

Book 129 A Laung Khit

Book 13 – The Monkey and the Crocodile

Book 131 Aladdin and the Magic Lamp

Book 22 -The Elephant Girlie Face

Book 35 – TIKI-PU AND WIO-WANI

Book 47 – Two Burmese Tales – A DISRESPECTFUL DAUGHTER & THE THREE SISTERS

Book 58 – A Greedy King

Book 68 A Lesson for Kings

Book 79 A Rabbit Story

Book 81 A Son of Adam

Book 84 – Two Burmese Folktales – A SAD FATE & FRIENDS

 

INDIA – India, Bangladesh, Pakistan

Book 03 – The Evil Eye of Sani

Book 14 – CONKIAJGHARUNA

Book 23 – The Broken Pot

Book 233 Tiger Tom

Book 244 The Son of Seven Queens

 

MIDDLE EAST – Arabian Nights, Persian, Turkish, Jewish, Armenian

Book 05 – The Pixie of the Well

Book 15 – Ameen and the Ghool

Book 17 – The Story of Bostanai – Persian

Book 197 THE PERPLEXITY OF ZADIG – Babylon

Book 20 – ARA AND SEMIRAMIS – Armenian

Book 215 THE PRINCESS OF BABYLON

Book 222 THE THREE CALENDERS – Arabian Nights

Book 223 THE FISHERMAN AND THE GENIE – Arabian Nights

Book 224 THE STORY OF THE KING OF THE EBONY ISLES – Arabian Nights

Book 225 Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves – Arabian Nights

Book 226 THE STORY OF THE MAGIC HORSE – Arabian Nights

Book 227 THE STORY OF THE WICKED HALF-BROTHERS – Arabian Nights

Book 228 HOW THE CAMEL GOT HIS HUMP – Arabian

Book 229 THE CAT THAT WALKED BY HIMSELF – Arabian

Book 230 THE STORY OF THE MERCHANT AND THE JINNEE – Arabian

Book 231 THE STORY OF THE FISHERMAN – Arabian

Book 239 THE STORY OF THE THREE APPLES

Book 241 THE STORY OF NOOR-ED-DEEN AND ENEES-EL-JELEES

Book 242 THE SUMERIAN STORY OF THE GREAT FLOOD

Book 240 THE STORY OF THE HUMPBACK

Book 253 THE STORY OF THE PORTER AND THE LADIES OF BAGHDAD

Book 254 THE STORY OF THE FIRST ROYAL MENDICANT – Arabian Nights

Book 255 THE STORY OF THE SECOND ROYAL MENDICANT – Arabian Nights

Book 256 THE STORY OF THE THIRD ROYAL MENDICANT – Arabian Nights

Book 27 – The Soothsayer

Book 40 – An Armenian Story and an Armenian Poem

Book 97 Little Hyacinths Kiosk

A sample of 25 Baba Indaba Children's Stories Covers

A sample of 25 Baba Indaba Children’s Stories Covers

Zlatovkaska The Golden Haired - Baba Indaba Children's Stories

Zlatovkaska The Golden Haired – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 74

 

In Issue 74 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Slovak tale of Zlatovlaska the Golden-Haired, also known as Yirik And The Snake. A cook disobeys his king and tastes a meal to a magic recipe and learns the speech of animals. His animal speaking triggers adventure, and the empathy he feels and shows to the animals secures his ultimate success.

You’ll have to download and read the story to find out what happened.

 

eBook Link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_ZLATOVLASKA_THE_GOLDEN_HAIRED_A_Slova?id=oLIQDAAAQBAJ

 

Each issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

Eastern European Folklore 5 bookset - BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL

Eastern European Folklore 5 bookset – BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL

Ideal for parents, grandparents and lovers of fairy tales and of all things magic!

In addition this is a unique collection for primary/elementary school libraries. 

Herein you will find 5 books containing 84 old Eastern European folk and fairy tales, containing tales of dragons, both magnanimous and evil, tales of princes on their white chargers dashing in to rescue princesses in distress and tales of the little people – the fairy folk that live in each and every fairy tale.

These books were bestsellers when they were first published, some over 120 years ago, at a time when people REALLY DID BELIEVE in fairies. These are tales from the forests and lane-side hedgerows as well as tales of fairy dances, which only ever occur at midnight under a full moon. And then there are tales of how lowly laborers applied their brains to a situation to win the hand of princesses and become kings of kingdoms. Plus there are other tales of how kings, forever protective of their precious princesses, set ever more difficult challenges to those wanting to win the hand of their daughters, who, of course, are the fairest and most beautiful in all the land!

TEACHERS read a page or two from a story at the end of the school day and have your students queuing up to hear the next part of the story day after day.

Buy eBooks link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_BLACK_FRIDAY_SPECIAL_EASTERN_EUROPEAN?id=mMiCDQAAQBAJ

Buy Paperbacks Link: http://abelapublishing.com/black-friday-special-35-off–eastern-european-folklore-5-book-set_p29295464.htm

 

Bibliographic Data
ISBN, TITLE, # stories, #pages
978-1-909302-54-9 – Czechoslovak Fairy Tales 15 Stories, 236pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-55-6 – Fairy Tales of the Slav Peasants and Herdsmen 20 Stories, 398pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-23-5 – The Key of Gold – 23 Czech Folk Tales, 200pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-44-0 – The Shoemaker’s Apron – 20 Czechoslovak fairy tales, 270pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-67-9 – Polish Fairy Tales 6 Stories, 192pg Illustrated.

So all-in-all, 84 stories and tales spread across 1,296 sumptuously illustrated pages.

Go, find a comfy chair, and sit back with a hot toddy, and enjoy a change of scenery and a change of pace and be whisked away to a land far, far away where only magical things happen.

 

Authentic Gypsy Folk Tales illustrated 2 book set - Black Friday Special

Authentic Gypsy Folk Tales illustrated 2 book set – Black Friday Special

 

Buy eBooks link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_BLACK_FRIDAY_EARLY_BIRD_SPECIAL_GYPSY?id=po-CDQAAQBAJ

Buy Paperbacks link: http://abelapublishing.com/black-friday-early-bird-special-39-off–gypsy-folk-tales–2-bookset_p27279562.htm

 

Francis Hindes Groome (Born 30 August 1851 in Monk Soham, Suffolk, England – died 24 January 1902 in London), son of Robert Hindes Groome Archdeacon of Suffolk. A writer and foremost commentator of his time on the Romani people, their language, life, history, customs, beliefs, and lore.

In October 1901, Francis Hindes Groome’s library of books, letters, and manuscripts bearing upon the study of the Gypsies was purchased by the Boston Athenæum. The collection comprises over one hundred volumes, some which are rare, and others contain rare tracts and magazine articles. There are also Mr. Groome’s own books with his marginal additions, over thirty volumes of manuscript notes, lectures, and his correspondence with M. Paul Bataillard, the eminent French student of the Gypsies, covering the years 1872-1880.

 

In Issue 59 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the European folktale of how gullible people in the world are. A poor farm laborer, sends his wife to market to sell their last hen. But then starts the story of how he and his wife used the gullibility of people to trade their way to a more comfortable life. But just how did they do it? Download and read the story to find out how.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_GULLIBLE_WORLD_An_Eastern_European?id=VlMJDAAAQBAJ

59-a-gullible-world

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