You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Moral Tales’ category.

Why buy the whole book when you can just buy the story?

 

The Drowned Buccaneer – This is the story of a New England treasure hunter keen to improve his lot. Did Captain Kidd really bury treasure on the coast of New England or not? The rumours still abound and people still seek his lost fortune.

Red cap found Singing - The Drowned BuccaneerRed cap found Singing

The Perlexity of Zadig – An ancient Persian tale. Zadig has an eye for detail, and when he describes events without having seen them, people become suspicious believing him to have magical powers.

The King and Queen rejoice at the pets return - The Perplexity of Zadig

The King and Queen rejoice at the pets return – The Perplexity of Zadig

 

The Return of the Dead Wife – a tale from the American Indians. A beloved wife dies and a brave is at a loss what to do without her. He travels north and makes a surprising find……

The Chief Finds his Wife is ill - The Dead Wife Returns

The Chief Finds his Wife is ill – The Dead Wife Returns

Young Amazon Snell – Hannah Snell always wanted to join the army but as a woman in the 1700’s was prevented from do so – until she hatches a plan. But will she get away with it? The true story of Hannah “Amazon” Snell in the early 18th C.

"A Toast!" The YOUNG AMAZON SNELL

“A Toast!” The YOUNG AMAZON SNELL

 

Rip Van Winkle – The original version of this all-time classic about the brow-beaten Rip van Winkle who went hinting and became “lost” for almost 20 years. Eelaborately illustrated by the great Arthur Rackham.

"Who are you" Rip Van Winkle

“Who are you” Rip Van Winkle

 

URL: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_uSt1pOjiJgXeLdIIQy8MCGB8v4KJiIQbo2mFxQR8K0/pub

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 30

In Issue 30 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Aesop’s fable about an old lion who pretends to be ill. But is he as ill as he is making out to be? Look out for the moral at the end of the story.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover African folklore, legends and tales, which seem to have originated from an altogether separate reservoir of lore and legend.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

URL: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Aesop_THE_OLD_LION_AND_THE_JACKAL_An_Aesop_s_Fable?id=hbH6CwAAQBAJ

Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 30

The Old Lion and the Jackal – An Aesop’s Fable

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 29

In Issue 29 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the South African tale of the council of the birds and the reason, the decision they made and why the Whitecrow never speaks. Remember to look out for the moral in the story! This story is alternatively known as “Tink Tinkie”.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so this does not cover African folklore, legends and tales, which originated from an altogether separate reservoir of lore and legend.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_WHY_THE_WHITECROW_NEVER_SPEAKS_A_Sout?id=lqr6CwAAQBAJ

 

baba indaba childrens stories issue 29

Why the Whitecrow Never Speaks – Tink Tinkie

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 28

In Issue 28 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Aesop’s fable about the Eagle and the Crow. The crow is misguided and thinks he is an eagle, with disastrous circumstances. Remember to look out for the moral in the tale!

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Aesop_THE_EAGLE_AND_THE_CROW_An_Aesop_s_Fable_for?id=lp76CwAAQBAJ

 

The Eagle and the Crow - Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 28

The Eagle and the Crow – An Aesop’s Fable

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 27

In Issue 27 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Persian tale of the Soothsayer’s Wife and the (poor) Hodja. – a teacher of sorts who wants to improve his lot in life. But just how does the Hodja succeed?

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_SOOTHSAYERS_WIFE_AND_THE_HODJA_A?id=_176CwAAQBAJ

The Soothsayer’s Wife and the Hodja – A Persian Folktale narrated by Baba Indaba – Issue 27

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 26
In Issue 26 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Aesop’s fable of the Wolf and the Kid. A kid goat was frolicking and playing so much he did not hear the call to go home. The wolf sees the lone goat and sees a chance for dinner. Some quick thinking is required, but what happens? Look for the moral in the story.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. It is thought that Aesop collected his fables at the Western terminus of the Silk Route in Greece millennia ago.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Aesop_THE_WOLF_AND_THE_KID_an_Aesop_s_Fable_for_ch?id=k1P6CwAAQBAJ

The Wolf and the Kid - A Baba Indaba Children's Story issue 26

The Wolf and the Kid – an Aesop’s Fable

A unique SPECIAL OFFER of 32 BRAZILIAN FOLK AND FAIRY TALES from the land of the 2016 Olympics

Discounted by 25% PLUS FREE SHIPPING

Amazonian tales of Giants, monkeys, how night came and more

Two Illustrated PERFECT BOUND paperbacks printed from certified sustainable forests to ISO Specification

BUY HERE >> http://abelapublishing.com/30-brazilian-folk-and-fairy-tales–olympics-special-offer_p31485781.htm

 

Herein you will find 30 uniquely Brazilian tales from the land of the 2016 Olympics. It should be noted that there are not many volumes of Brazilian Folklore to be found. But within these two unique volumes – Brazilian Fairy Tales and Tales of Giants from Brazil, you will find 30 stories from that vast and amazing country compiled especially by Elsie Spicer Eells. As Spicer-Eells puts it, “Brazil is the land of giant fruits and giant flowers. Of course it is the land of giant stories too.”

 

Stories like HOW NIGHT CAME, HOW THE RABBIT LOST HIS TAIL, HOW THE TOAD GOT HIS BRUISES, WHY THE LAMB IS MEEK, THE PRINCESS OF THE SPRINGS, THE FOUNTAIN OF GIANT LAND, THE LITTLE SISTER OF THE GIANTS, THE GIANTS PUPIL and many, many more.

Residents of the Amazonian forests know that the animals of the forest and the birds which flit through the trees each have their own language. To them the beasts break silence and talk like humans. For them, the magic wonders of these tales stand forth as testament and living truth that the animals do speak to humans, if only we would take the time to stop and listen to what they have to say. These volumes are an interpretation of but a few of the stories they have told.

 

So, find a comfy chair, and when you get bored with yet another program on the Olympics, sit back with a hot toddy, and enjoy a change of scenery and a change of pace with these 30 unique and authentic Brazilian folk stories and fairy tales while the narrator drones away listening to the sound of their own voice.

 

Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tales of Giants from Brazil - with rescued princess he made his escape9781910882764 Tales of Giants from Brazil - cover

Fairy Tales from Brazil - Cover

Fairy Tales from Brazil – Cover

How Night CameTales of Giants from Brazil - a most beautiful princess

In Issue 25 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the West African folktale about Miss Salt and Miss Pepper and their friends the Sauces and the Onion Leaves. They hear of a handsome youth and go off to see if they can win his attention. On the way poor little Onion Leaves is mocked and asked to walk elsewhere because she smells so much. Walking by herself Onion Leaves helps an old lady whom the others ignored – with surprising results. Look out for the moral of the tale.
 
INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. But African folklore has altogether different origins.
 
This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 25
 
In Issue 24 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of SALT and that of Ivan the Ninny. His father gave two great ships to Ivan’s older brothers and a small, worn-out ship with patchwork sails to Ivan and sends them across to trade. But Ivan comes back with his ship laden with treasure and a Princess on his arm, while his brothers don’t have much to show. How did Ivan do it? Well you’ll have to read the story to find out!
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.
 
This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 24 (Digital)
 

Salat – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

In Issue 23 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Indian tale of a mean Brahman whose dreams about what riches he could obtain if he traded his possessions. His greed and imagination get the better of his common sense with disastrous results. Look out for the moral of the tale.
 
INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.
 
This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 23 (Digital)
 
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