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A Little Brave and the Medicine Woman - A Lakota Sioux legend narrated by Baba Indaba

A Little Brave and the Medicine Woman – A Lakota Sioux legend narrated by Baba Indaba

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 70

In Issue 70 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Lakota, Sioux tale of strange goings on around the grave of a long-dead Medicine woman. He takes a few boys to show them where the grave is when pandemonium breaks loose. Download and read the story to find out what happened.

Each issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_LITTLE_BRAVE_AND_THE_MEDICINE_WOMAN?id=8IkODAAAQBAJ

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

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A Creation Legend of Manabozho

A Creation Legend of Manabozho

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 67

 

In Issue 67 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the American Legend of the time Manabozho made the land. Manabozho was out hunting with two wolves. One left him and chose his own path while the other stayed to hunt with Manabozho. How did the legend come about you ask? Well you’ll just have to download and read the story to find out!

 

Each issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

eBook link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_LEGEND_OF_MANABOZHO_A_Native_Americ?id=YzUODAAAQBAJ

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

A Katcina Race Between the Walpi and the Oraibi - Hopi Folklore narrated by Baba Indaba

A Katcina Race Between the Walpi and the Oraibi – Hopi Folklore narrated by Baba Indaba

The Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name “Anon E. Mouse” which, of course, is a play on the word “Anonymous”.

A Journey to the Skeleton House - 2 Native American Hopi folk tales narrated by Baba Indaba

A Journey to the Skeleton House – 2 Native American Hopi folk tales narrated by Baba Indaba

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 63

 

In Issue 63 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates two variations of the same story about a Hopi youth who was curious about the Skeleton House – where the dead were buried. He wondered if anyone lived there. Seeking an answer he began to fast and pray and after a few days received his answer. But what was it…? Well you’ll have to download and read the stories to find out what it was.

eBook link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_JOURNEYS_TO_THE_SKELETON_HOUSE_Two_va?id=cEkLDAAAQBAJ

Each issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

In Issue 60 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Hopi tale of what happened during raid on a Navaho village during a ceremonial dance.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_HOPI_RAID_ON_A_NAVAHO_DANCE_A_Hopi?id=5l4JDAAAQBAJ

60-cover

In Issue 56 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Inca legend of The Lost Island. Huaina Ccapac, third Sapa Inca (divine king – 1468–1527 AD) of the Inca Empire, decided to serve only one god. He destroyed the graven images of the many Inca gods with disastrous consequences. Download and read the story to find out what happened.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_LOST_ISLAND_An_Inca_Legend?id=LTkJDAAAQBAJ

56-the-lost-island

 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 51

In Issue 51 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the ancient Mexican legend of NEZAHUALPILLI KING OF TEXCOCO and the magnificent palace he built and lived in. The opulence of the palace so amazed the Spanish Conquistadors that they reported that it rivalled the best palaces of Europe and the East. We invite you to download and read the amazing reports on Nezahualpilli’s palace in Texcoco.

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES!

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. “Baba Indaba” translates as “Father of Stories”.

URL: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_NEZAHUALPILLI_KING_OF_TEXCOCO_A_Centr?id=Jq8IDAAAQBAJ

Nezahualpilli King of Texcoco cover

Nezahualpilli King of Texcoco – cover

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 48
In Issue 48 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the legend about the Death of Tupac, King of the Inca and the subsequent events. Following King Tupac’s death his appointed heir took the throne, but as in so many transfers of power, a younger brother thought he should have been appointed. This follows a period of civil war which was only brought to an end by another cataclysmic event which brought the mighty Inca age to a close.
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
The Death of Tupac King of the Inca - Baba Indaba Children's Stories

The Death of Tupac King of the Inca – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

A DINNER AND ITS CONSEQUENCES – A Nimpuc American Indian folktale from Massachusetts: Baba Indaba Children’s Stories Issue 42
 
In Issue 42 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the American Indian legend from Massachusetts of “A Dinner and it’s Consequences” which teaches that good manners and politeness always pays dividends.
 
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.
 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 38

In Issue 38 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Mixtec story of creation and the flood. The Mixtecs were the ancestors of the Mexicans. Baba tells the story of how the gods lived in peace and harmony at Apoala, which translates as “Place where the Heavens Stood” and how their sons, named Wind-Nine-Snake (Viento de Neuve Culebras) and Wind-Nine-Cave (Viento de Neuve Cavernas) prayed for land to appear.

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

FOLLOW THIS LINK: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_MIXTEC_CREATION_STORY_An_Ancient?id=tsT_CwAAQBAJ

 

Mixtec Creation Story - Cover

Mixtec Creation Story – Cover

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