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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 37

In Issue 37 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Jamaican Anansi story of the cockroach and the cock with disastrous consequences for cockroach. Look out for the moral of the story.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

FOLLOW THIS LINK: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_COCK_S_BREAKFAST_A_Jamaican_Anansi_Ta?id=zL__CwAAQBAJ

 

Cock's Breakfast

Cock’s Breakfast

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A Dog and a Cock, who were the best of friends, wished very much to see something of the world. So they decided to leave the farmyard and to set out into the world along the road that led to the woods. The two comrades travelled along in the very best of spirits and without meeting any adventure to speak of.

The Dog, the cock and the fox from Aesop for children

At nightfall the Cock, looking for a place to roost, as was his custom, spied nearby a hollow tree that he thought would do very nicely for a night’s lodging. The Dog could creep inside and the Cock would fly up on one of the branches. So said, so done, and both slept very comfortably.

 

With the first glimmer of dawn the Cock awoke. For the moment he forgot just where he was. He thought he was still in the farmyard where it had been his duty to arouse the household at daybreak. So standing on tip-toes he flapped his wings and crowed lustily. But instead of awakening the farmer, he awakened a Fox not far off in the wood. The Fox immediately had rosy visions of a very delicious breakfast. Hurrying to the tree where the Cock was roosting, he said very politely:

 

“A hearty welcome to our woods, honoured sir. I cannot tell you how glad I am to see you here. I am quite sure we shall become the closest of friends.”

 

“I feel highly flattered, kind sir,” replied the Cock slyly. “If you will please go around to the door of my house at the foot of the tree, my porter will let you in.”

 

The hungry but unsuspecting Fox, went around the tree as he was told, and in a twinkling the Dog had seized him.

Moral: Those who try to deceive may expect to be paid in their own coin

 

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From: ÆSOP FOR CHILDREN

 

Available as a PDF eBook at:  http://store.payloadz.com/details/1011742-ebooks-children%27s-ebooks-aesop-for-children-1919-.html

 

The Dog, the cock and the fox from Aesop for children

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to CECILY’S FUND, a charity educating and supporting Zambian children orphaned by aids.

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