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Herein are 119 satirical cartoons published in Punch between 1890 and 1915 which focus on the growing threat of war in the years preceding and during the first two years of the GREAT WAR.
The cartoons are grouped into the following categories:

  • The Days Preceding the War
  • The Struggle
  • Uncle Sam
  • The Comedies of the Great Tragedy
  • Women and Children First
  • The New Rake’s Progress—Unser Kaiser
  • The Raider
  • The Unspeakable Turk
  • Italia!

The cartoons encompass all the Allied nations and most of those aligned with the Central Powers. The sea war also features the antics of both navies and of course the sinking of non-military liners.
During the war the media swung into action in effect becoming an Allied propaganda machine. In addition to Punch, Dutchman Louis Raemakers was also proactive in this media. Raemakers cartoons were so effective that he and his family had to flee the Netherlands when the German High Command offered a reward for his capture.
Working in London he continued to publish his cartoons mainly in The Times and even went on a promotional tour of the USA. It was thought that his many works, which can be seen in the eBooks Raemakers Cartoons of WWI – vols. 1 & 2, was partly instrumental in changing the opinion of the American public towards involvement in the “European” war.

The effect of these cartoons on rallying public opinion before and during the Great War was incalculable and the propaganda machine continued to play a major role in the conflicts following the Great War.

Format: eBook – ePub, Kindle/Mobi, PDF
Download Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/various/punch-cartoons-of-the-great-war-119-great-war-cartoons-published-in-punch/

Punch Cartoons of the Great War

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Eastern European Folklore 5 bookset - BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL

Eastern European Folklore 5 bookset – BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL

Ideal for parents, grandparents and lovers of fairy tales and of all things magic!

In addition this is a unique collection for primary/elementary school libraries. 

Herein you will find 5 books containing 84 old Eastern European folk and fairy tales, containing tales of dragons, both magnanimous and evil, tales of princes on their white chargers dashing in to rescue princesses in distress and tales of the little people – the fairy folk that live in each and every fairy tale.

These books were bestsellers when they were first published, some over 120 years ago, at a time when people REALLY DID BELIEVE in fairies. These are tales from the forests and lane-side hedgerows as well as tales of fairy dances, which only ever occur at midnight under a full moon. And then there are tales of how lowly laborers applied their brains to a situation to win the hand of princesses and become kings of kingdoms. Plus there are other tales of how kings, forever protective of their precious princesses, set ever more difficult challenges to those wanting to win the hand of their daughters, who, of course, are the fairest and most beautiful in all the land!

TEACHERS read a page or two from a story at the end of the school day and have your students queuing up to hear the next part of the story day after day.

Buy eBooks link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_BLACK_FRIDAY_SPECIAL_EASTERN_EUROPEAN?id=mMiCDQAAQBAJ

Buy Paperbacks Link: http://abelapublishing.com/black-friday-special-35-off–eastern-european-folklore-5-book-set_p29295464.htm

 

Bibliographic Data
ISBN, TITLE, # stories, #pages
978-1-909302-54-9 – Czechoslovak Fairy Tales 15 Stories, 236pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-55-6 – Fairy Tales of the Slav Peasants and Herdsmen 20 Stories, 398pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-23-5 – The Key of Gold – 23 Czech Folk Tales, 200pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-44-0 – The Shoemaker’s Apron – 20 Czechoslovak fairy tales, 270pg Illustrated.
978-1-909302-67-9 – Polish Fairy Tales 6 Stories, 192pg Illustrated.

So all-in-all, 84 stories and tales spread across 1,296 sumptuously illustrated pages.

Go, find a comfy chair, and sit back with a hot toddy, and enjoy a change of scenery and a change of pace and be whisked away to a land far, far away where only magical things happen.

 

On this day in 1895, the Delagoa Bay (Maputo, Mozambique) Railway opened in South-Africa by President Paul Kruger. The link connected the Transvaal (Boer) Republic with the coast without having to go through the British controlled ports of Port Natal (Durban) or Cape Town.

 

As such we bring you a South African folktale of heroism during the “Groot Trek” (Great Trek) inland from the Cape Colony. This story occurred in about 1843 approximately 50 years before the Boer Wars (yes, plural, there were 2 Boer Wars)……..

 

Rachel de Beer (1831–1843) (sometimes known by the diminutive form, Racheltjie) is an Afrikaner heroine who gave her life in order to save that of her brother. She was the daughter of George Stephanus de Beer (b. 1794).

 

The fable goes that in the winter months of 1843 Rachel was part of a trek from the Orange Free State to the south-eastern Transvaal. During one of their nightly stopovers, the members of the trek realised that a calf called Frikkie, much-beloved by their children, was missing.

 

A search party was formed, in which Rachel and her six-year old brother also took part. However, during the gathering dusk Rachel and her brother got separated from the search party and became lost. As the night progressed it got very cold and started snowing.

 

Realising that their chances of survival were slim, Rachel found an abandoned anthill, hollowed out by an aardvark, took off her clothes, put them on her brother and commanded him to get into the hollowed-out anthill. She then lay in front of the opening of the anthill in order to keep out the cold.

 

The children were found the next morning by the trekking party. Rachel was dead, but her brother had survived.

 

Note: The story of Rachel de Beer is entrenched in the Afrikaner culture, which is evident by the number of streets and schools named after her.

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