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It will soon be 100 years since the cessation of hostilities which brought WWI to an end on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th Month of 1918. Abela Publishing author, Richard Marman, author of the McAlister Line has put together a montage of images he sketched during the creation of McAlister and the Great War, book 2 in the McAlister Line which makes for interesting viewing.

Click the link to to view the video: https://www.facebook.com/McAlistersAdventures/videos/361380441267388/?t=2

McAlister and The Great War Cover

McAlister and the Great War is available as a paperback and in multiple eBook formats.

PaperBack (on Amazon): https://www.amazon.com/McAlister-Great-War-Line/dp/1925833038/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1539017047&sr=1-3&keywords=McAlister+and+the+Great+War

eBook (in ePub, Kindle & PDF) : https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/richard-marman/mcalister-and-the-great-war-book-2-in-the-mcalister-line/

The McAlister Line is a series of books tracing the exploits and adventures of the McAlister Family from Southern England through their relocation to Australia in the 19th C and their involvement in WWI and WWII. The story really picks up when Danny McAlister escapes from a draconian boarding school in Australia and travel’s North into the Northern Territories. He then crosses the Gulf of Carpentaria to Indonesia and then onto French Indo China where he becomes involved in the war in the region – the forerunner to the Vietnamese war.

The McAlister line is a fast paced action and adventure series for lovers of the genre and a enthralling read for young adults. All the books in the series can be found on Amazon or at https://mcalisters-adventures.stores.streetlib.com/en/

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Herein are 119 satirical cartoons published in Punch between 1890 and 1915 which focus on the growing threat of war in the years preceding and during the first two years of the GREAT WAR.
The cartoons are grouped into the following categories:

  • The Days Preceding the War
  • The Struggle
  • Uncle Sam
  • The Comedies of the Great Tragedy
  • Women and Children First
  • The New Rake’s Progress—Unser Kaiser
  • The Raider
  • The Unspeakable Turk
  • Italia!

The cartoons encompass all the Allied nations and most of those aligned with the Central Powers. The sea war also features the antics of both navies and of course the sinking of non-military liners.
During the war the media swung into action in effect becoming an Allied propaganda machine. In addition to Punch, Dutchman Louis Raemakers was also proactive in this media. Raemakers cartoons were so effective that he and his family had to flee the Netherlands when the German High Command offered a reward for his capture.
Working in London he continued to publish his cartoons mainly in The Times and even went on a promotional tour of the USA. It was thought that his many works, which can be seen in the eBooks Raemakers Cartoons of WWI – vols. 1 & 2, was partly instrumental in changing the opinion of the American public towards involvement in the “European” war.

The effect of these cartoons on rallying public opinion before and during the Great War was incalculable and the propaganda machine continued to play a major role in the conflicts following the Great War.

Format: eBook – ePub, Kindle/Mobi, PDF
Download Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/various/punch-cartoons-of-the-great-war-119-great-war-cartoons-published-in-punch/

Punch Cartoons of the Great War

Low and brown barns, thatched and repatched and tattered,
Where I had seven sons until to-day—
A little hill of hay your spur has scattered….
This is not Paris. You have lost the way.

You, staring at your sword to find it brittle,
Surprised at the surprise that was your plan,
Who shaking and breaking barriers not a little,
Find never more the death-door of Sedan.

Must I for more than carnage call you claimant,
Paying you a penny for each son you slay?
Man, the whole globe in gold were no repayment
For what you have lost. And how shall I repay?

What is the price of that red spark that caught me
From a kind farm that never had a name?
What is the price of that dead man they brought me?
For other dead men do not look the same.

How should I pay for one poor graven steeple
Whereon you shattered what you shall not know?
How should I pay you, miserable people,
How should I pay you everything you owe?

Unhappy, can I give you back your honour?
Though I forgave, would any man forget?
While all the great green land has trampled on her
The treason and terror of the night we met.

Not any more in vengeance or in pardon,
One old wife bargains for a bean that’s hers.
You have no word to break: no heart to harden.
Ride on and prosper. You have lost your spurs.

G. K. Chesterton 1917

From POEMS of the GREAT WAR raising funds for the Royal British Legion (the equivalent of the Returned Servicemen’s Association or Veterans Association)

http://abelapublishing.com/poems-of-the-great-war–1914-to-1918_p28280158.htm

Poems of the Great War_wpers

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