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Baba Yaga, Russian, Girl with the Kind Heart - Cover

Baba Yaga, Russian, Girl with the Kind Heart – Cover

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 85

In Issue 85 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of “Baba Yaga and the Girl with a Kind Heart”. A while after the death of his wife,  poor peasant farmer decides to marry again, if only to give his daughter a mother. This he does but when he is out working in the fields and in the forest, all is not well at home.

What was the final outcome? Well, you’ll just have to download and read the story to find out what was really going on.

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN’S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_BABA_YAGA_AND_THE_LITTLE_GIRL_WITH_TH?id=chQaDAAAQBAJ

In Issue 24 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of SALT and that of Ivan the Ninny. His father gave two great ships to Ivan’s older brothers and a small, worn-out ship with patchwork sails to Ivan and sends them across to trade. But Ivan comes back with his ship laden with treasure and a Princess on his arm, while his brothers don’t have much to show. How did Ivan do it? Well you’ll have to read the story to find out!
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.
 
This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 24 (Digital)
 

Salat – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

Not long ago, or perchance very long ago, I do not know for sure, there lived in a village, some place in Russia, a peasant—a moujik. And this peasant was a stubborn and a quick-tempered fellow, and his name was Dimian.

 

He was harsh by nature, this Dimian, and wanted everything to go his own way. If anyone talked or acted against him, Dimian’s fists were soon prepared for answer.

 

Sometimes, for instance, he would invite one of his neighbors and treat his guest with fine things to eat and to drink. And the neighbor in order to maintain the old custom would pretend to refuse. Dimian would at once begin the dispute:

 

“Thou must obey thy host!”

 

Once it happened that a shrewd fellow called on him. Our moujik Dimian covered the table with the very best he had and rejoiced over the good time he foresaw.

 

The fellow guest speedily ate everything up. Dimian was rather amazed, but brought out his kaftan.

 

“Take off thy sheepskin,” said he to the guest; “put on my new kaftan.”

 

In proposing it he thought within himself:

 

“I will bet that this time he will not dare accept; then I will teach him a lesson.”

 

But the fellow quickly put on the new kaftan, tightened it with the belt, shook his curly head and answered:

 

“Have my thanks, uncle, for thy gift. How could I dare not take it? Why, one must obey his host’s bidding.”

 

Dimian’s temper was rising, and he wanted at any rate to have his own way. But what to do? He hastened to the stable, brought out his best horse, and said to his guest:

 

“Thou art welcome to all my belongings,” and within himself he thought, “He certainly will refuse this time, and then my turn will come.”

 

But the fellow did not refuse, and smilingly answered:

 

“In thy house thou art the ruler,” and quickly he jumped on the horse’s back and shouted to Dimian, the peasant:

 

“Farewell, master! no one pushed thee into the trap but thyself,” and with these words the fellow was off.

 

Dimian looked after him and shook his head.

Dimian the Peasant from Folk Tales from the Russian

“Well, I struck a snag,” said he.

 

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From: FOLK TALES FROM THE RUSSIAN

ISBN: 978-1-907256-XX-X

http://www.abelapublishing.com/cg_ftftr.html

 

A percentage of the profits will be donated to UNICEF.

 

Folk Tales from the Russian