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By Howard Pease

 

The tales which make up this volume all appeared in print in various publications before 1899 (some of which have since gone out of circulation).

 

‘A Long Main,’ ‘In Memoriov’m,’ in the National Observer; ‘The Protégé,’ in the Queen; ‘Quaker John and Yankee Bill,’ ‘T’Owd Squire,’ ‘An Ammytoor Detective,’ in the Newcastle Courant; ‘À l’Outrance,’ in the Newcastle Weekly Chronicle; and the remaining six in the Newcastle Daily Leader.

 

So popular were they that the author was persuaded to put them into one volume “Tales of Northumbria”. But why Northumbria you ask? Well some of them stretch back in time to when the term Northumbria was still in use.

Herein you will find 13 tales from Northumbria, Northumberland and the surrounding area.

 

These are:

‘A Long Main’

The Squire’s Last Ride

À L’outrance

‘T’owd Squire’

An ‘Ammytoor’ Detective

‘In Memoriov’m’

‘The Heckler’ Upon Womenfolk

The ‘Caleb Jay’

Geordie Armstrong ‘The Jesu-Yte’

‘Geordie Ride-The-Stang’

Yankee Bill And Quaker John

The Protégé

The Spanish Doubloon

 

This volume is sure to keep you enchanted for hours, if only not because of the story’s content, but because of their quality, and they will have you coming back for more time-and-again.

 

ISBN: 9788828374541

DOWNLOAD LINK: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/howard-pease/tales-of-northumbria-13-tales-from-northern-england/

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KEYWORDS/TAGS: folklore, fairy tales, myths, legend, land, , stories, wonder tales, A Long Main, Squire, Last Ride, L’outrance, T’owd, Ammytoor, Detective, In Memoriov’m, memoriam, Heckler, Womenfolk, Caleb Jay, Geordie Armstrong, The Jesu-Yte, Jesuit, Ride-The-Stang, Yankee Bill, Quaker John, Protégé, Spanish, Doubloon, short stories, characters

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A fantastic tale of the demon-haunted forests of 13th C. Germany. In the Dale of the Dragon, or Der Tal des Drachen, lives a young man named Jerome, the hero of our story. In the surrounding forest lives the witch Martha and her twin ravens which speak of Satan, who even makes an appearance to tempt Jerome to the dark side of life.

But what is a haunted forest if it doesn’t have robber barons and outlaws, and what would our story be without Agnes the maiden, who is, of course, in distress. Who is the mysterious Saint of the Dragon’s Dale – a powerful, mysterious figure with a dark secret. Will he ride in to save the day, or will he be too late.

To find the answers to these, and any other questions you may have, download this little book and find out for yourself.

Format: ebook – Kindle.Mobi, ePub, PDF
Download link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/william-s-davis/the-saint-of-the-dragons-dale-medieval-action-and-adventure/

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We have created a dedicated area for the digitised illustrated works of Andrew Lang. In the main these consist of the Many Coloured Fairy Books plus his other illustrated works.

 

Of note are the Arabian Nights Entertainments – containing 32 tales from the 1001 Arabian Nights. These were selected and compiled by Andrew Lang and detail heroic figures such as Aladdin, Ali Baba, Sinbad, and others, whose luck and ingenuity carry them through perilous adventures.

 

Like the Grimm brothers, Andrew Lang collected fairytales from around the world. Where necessary he and his wife translated and retold them in English.

 

The publisher Longmans, Green and company, now a part of the Pearson publishing empire, teamed Lang up with illustrator H. J. Ford, and what a partnership it was. It was so good that during the late Victorian era the works by Andrew Lang outsold those created by the Grimms.

 

So, you’re invited to download and enjoy.

 

All eBooks only US1.99 or about £1.50, €1.70, A$2.69, NZ$2.93, INR137.01, ZAR26.99 depending on the rates of exchange.

URL/LINK: https://the-many-colored-fairy-books-of-andrew-lang.stores.streetlib.com/en/

 

June’s sales figures are now in. Halfway through the month we saw how the Football world cup had taken some of the focus off Hawaii, but a late rally saw Hawaiian & Polynesian themed folktale reassert themselves.

Our top four bestselling books for June were:

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JUST SO STORIES – 12 illustrated Children’s Stories of how things came to be

ISBN: 9788828325000

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/rudyard-kipling/just-so-stories-12-illustrated-childrens-stories-of-how-things-came-to-be/

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MAORI FOLKLORE – 23 Maori Myths and Legends

ISBN: 9788822806758

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/sir-george-grey/maori-folklore-or-the-ancient-traditional-history-of-the-new-zealanders/

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OLD PETER’S RUSSIAN TALES – 20 illustrated Russian Children’s Stories

ISBN: 9788827560990

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/old-peters-russian-tales-20-illustrated-russian-childrens-stories/

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HAWAIIAN FOLK TALES – 34 Hawaiian folk and fairy tales

ISBN: 9788822801876

Link: https://folklore-fairy-tales-myths-legends-and-other-stories.stores.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/hawaiian-folk-tales-34-hawaiian-folk-and-fairy-tales/

 

Old Indian Legends, Wonderwings and Other Fairy Stories, Wonder Tales from Baltic Wizards and The Norwegian Book of Fairy Tales did their best to out-perform each other to take fifth spot.

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Two Aesops Fables - Baba Indaba Children's Stories

Two Aesops Fables – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 78

In Issue 78 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates two of Aesop’s fables – “The Raven and the Swan” and “The Frogs and the Ox.” These fables have been simplified and rewritten for children and, as per usual, there is an easily understandable moral for children.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

eBooks available in PDF and ePub formats. Link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Aesop_the_Storyteller_TWO_AESOP_S_FABLES_Simplifie?id=ys8VDAAAQBAJ

A Lost Paradise - An Old English Folktale

A Lost Paradise – An Old English Folktale

 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 71

 

In Issue 71 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates an old English folk tale about the poor charcoal burner and his wife who are on the brink of starving. The King takes pity on them and gives them shelter but lays down one condition. If the condition is broken they will lose all they have been given. What was the condition and was it broken? Well you’ll have to download and read the story to find out what happened.

 

eBook Link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_LOST_PARADISE_An_Old_English_Folk_T?id=UIsQDAAAQBAJ

 

Each issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

Ara and Semiramis – an Armenian tale of love

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 20 (Electronic)

In issue 20 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Armenian tale of how Queen Semiramis desired King Ara for her consort. King Ara rebuffed all her advances. Filled with rage she attacked King Ara’s kingdom, with disastrous results.

CONTAINS LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe.

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_ARA_AND_SEMIRAMIS?id=3Or3CwAAQBAJ

According to the custom of the Indians, Wamsutta, the eldest son of Massasoit, succeeded his father as grand sachem of the Wampanoags.

 

King Philip as Grand Sachem

King Philip as Grand Sachem

 

Almost his first act was to go to Plymouth, where he made some requests of the settlers. These were granted. Then he  asked for an English name, and was given the name of Alexander.

 

He was so much pleased with this name that he asked for an English name for his younger brother, Metacomet. The English gave him the name of Philip, by which name we have been calling him in our account of his life.

 

A few days later, ten armed men suddenly appeared at the place where Wamsutta and several of his followers were holding a feast, and arrested them all. Wamsutta was taken to Plymouth immediately, and charged with plotting with the Narragansetts against the English.

 

Being seized by force on their own grounds, and compelled to go to Plymouth to answer charges based on rumor, was a new, experience for the Wampanoags. It was very different from the friendly manner in which they had been treated formerly.

 

The English treated Wamsutta very well at Plymouth. They could prove nothing against him, and hence they soon let him go. On his way home he died.

 

As Wamsutta left no children, he was succeeded by his brother Philip. There was no ceremony of crowning, no procession, no speeches. In fact, there was no crown at all; nor was there any ceremony of any kind. The other Indians merely obeyed Philip just as they had formerly obeyed his father and his brother.

 

Philip and all the members of the Wampanoag tribe believed that Wamsutta’s death was due to poison which had been given him by the whites when he was at Plymouth. According to the belief and custom of the Indians, it was Philip’s duty to take vengeance on those who had caused his brother’s death.

 

Still, Philip made no attempt to injure the whites in any way. But the whites became suspicious, probably because they felt that they had done wrong; and very soon they summoned Philip to Plymouth to answer a charge of plotting against them.

 

Philip acted very honorably in the matter. Instead of hiding in the forest, as he might easily have done, he went to Plymouth. There he had a long talk with the whites. He denied that he had plotted against them. He showed them that it was against his own interests to have any trouble with them, and as proof of his good intentions toward them, he offered to leave his next younger brother with them as a hostage.

 

He agreed to continue the treaty that his father had made forty years before. He went further, and acknowledged himself to be a faithful subject of the King of England, and promised not to make war on any Indian tribe unless the English first gave their consent.

 

For several years Philip was grand sachem of the Wampanoags and kept this treaty with great faithfulness. During this time his duties were similar to those which his father had had, and his life was uneventful. He was consulted by the other sachems of the tribe, and his advice was generally followed by them.

Like his father, the good Massasoit, he was inclined to be conservative; that is, he did not like to change the established order of things. He was very much liked by the Indians, who felt that he tried to treat them all honestly and fairly.

 

He went to Plymouth very frequently, to visit the whites and to trade with them. And, likewise, the whites frequently came to Mount Hope to see him.

 

The relations between the whites and the Indians were such that it was perfectly safe for a white man to go anywhere among the Wampanoags unarmed. This is something that cannot be said of any other Indian tribe in the colonial days. The Indians, acting under orders from King Philip, treated the whites honestly and fairly. In fact, there was a feeling of great friendship between the whites and the Indians.

 

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From: LEGENDS AND STORIES OF MARTHA’S VINEYARD, NANTUCKET AND BLOCK ISLAND – A New Release – PREORDER NOW!

http://abelapublishing.com/legends-and-stories-from-marthas-vineyard-nantucket-and-block-island_p31019862.htm

Cover - Legends and Stories from Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket and Block Island

Cover – Legends and Stories from Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket and Block Island

Just loaded for it’s proof run LEGENDS AND STORIES FROM MARTHA’S VINEYARD, NANTUCKET AND BLOCK ISLAND. 21 legends and stories from the Cape Cod area which goes back to at least 1602.

Table of contents is:
MARTHA’S VINEYARD AND NANTUCKET
LOVE AND TREASON
THE HEADLESS SKELETON OF SWAMPTOWN
THE CROW AND CAT OF HOPKINSHILL
THE OLD STONE MILL
THE ORIGIN OF A NAME
MICAH ROOD APPLES
A DINNER AND ITS CONSEQUENCES
THE NEW HAVEN STORM SHIP
THE WINDAM FROGS
THE LAMB OF SACRIFICE
MOODUS NOISES
HADDAM ENCHANTMENTS

BLOCK ISLAND
THE BUCCANEER
ROBERT LOCKWOOD’S FATE
LOVE AND RUM
THE WHOLE HISTORY OF GRANDFATHER’S CHAIR
THE LOYALISTS OF MASSACHUSETTS
PUNISHMENT FOR WEARING LONG HAIR IN NEW ENGLAND
SCHOOL DISCIPLINE IN THE STATE OF MASSACHSETTS
THE SCHOOLMASTER’S SOLILOQUY
THE STORY OF KING PHILIP (of the Wampanoag tribe)

Cover - Legends and Stories from Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket and Block Island

Cover – Legends and Stories from Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket and Block Island

The fairy tales and legends of olden China have an oriental glow and glitter of precious stones and gold and multicolored silks, and an oriental wealth of fantastic and supernatural action, not too dissimilar to the tales in the Thousand and One Nights. The 73 stories herein embrace NURSERY FAIRY TALES, LEGENDS OF THE GODS, TALES OF SAINTS AND MAGICIANS, NATURE AND ANIMAL TALES, GHOST STORIES, HISTORIC FAIRY TALES, and LITERARY FAIRY TALES.

Like the Arabian Nights, they will fascinate the young listener and amply repay the attention of the older reader as well. Some are exquisitely poetic, such as THE FLOWER-ELVES, THE LADY OF THE MOON or THE HERD BOY AND THE WEAVING MAIDEN; others like HOW THREE HEROES CAME BY THEIR DEATHS BECAUSE OF TWO PEACHES, carry us back dramatically and powerfully to the Chinese age of Chivalry. The summits of fantasy are scaled in the quasi-religious dramas of THE APE SUN WU KUNG and NOTSCHA, or the weird sorceries unfolded in THE KINDLY MAGICIAN. Delightful ghost stories, with happy endings, such as A NIGHT ON THE BATTLEFIELD and THE GHOST WHO WAS FOILED, are paralleled with such idyllic love-tales as that of ROSE OF EVENING, or such Lilliputian fancies as THE KING OF THE ANTS and THE LITTLE HUNTING DOG.

It is quite safe to say that these Chinese fairy tales will give equal pleasure to the old as well as the young. They have been retold simply, with no changes in style or expression beyond such details of presentation which differences between oriental and occidental viewpoints at times compel. It is the writers hope that others may take as much pleasure in reading them as he did in their translation.

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.YESTERDAYS BOOKS RAISING FUNDS FOR TODAYS CHARITIES

TABLE of CONTENTS
NURSERY FAIRY TALES
I WOMENS WORDS PART FLESH AND BLOOD
II THE THREE RHYMSTERS
III HOW GREED FOR A TRIFLING THING LED A MAN TO LOSE A GREAT ONE
IV WHO WAS THE SINNER?
V THE MAGIC CASK
VI THE FAVORITE OF FORTUNE AND THE CHILD OF ILL LUCK
VII THE BIRD WITH NINE HEADS
VIII THE CAVE OF THE BEASTS
IX THE PANTHER
X THE GREAT FLOOD
XI THE FOX AND THE TIGER
XII THE TIGERS DECOY
XIII THE FOX AND THE RAVEN
XIV WHY DOG AND CAT ARE ENEMIES

LEGENDS OF THE GODS
XV HOW THE FIVE ANCIENTS BECAME MEN
XVI THE HERD BOY AND THE WEAVING MAIDEN
XVII YANG OERLANG
XVIII NOTSCHA
XIX THE LADY OF THE MOON
XX THE MORNING AND THE EVENING STAR
XXI THE GIRL WITH THE HORSES HEAD, or; THE SILKWORM GODDESS
XXII THE QUEEN OF HEAVEN
XXIII THE FIRE-GOD
XXIV THE THREE RULING GODS
XXV A LEGEND OF CONFUCIUS
XXVI THE GOD OF WAR

TALES OF SAINTS AND MAGICIANS
XXVII THE HALOS OF THE SAINTS
XXVIII LAOTSZE
XXIX THE ANCIENT MAN
XXX THE EIGHT IMMORTALS (I)
XXXI THE EIGHT IMMORTALS (II)
XXXII THE TWO SCHOLARS
XXXIII THE MISERLY FARMER
XXXIV SKY ODAWN
XXXV KING MU OF DSCHOU
XXXVI THE KING OF HUAI NAN
XXXVII OLD DSCHANG
XXXVIII THE KINDLY MAGICIAN

NATURE AND ANIMAL TALES
XXXIX THE FLOWER-ELVES
XL THE SPIRIT OF THE WU-LIAN MOUNTAIN
XLI THE KING OF THE ANTS
XLII THE LITTLE HUNTING DOG
XLIII THE DRAGON AFTER HIS WINTER SLEEP
XLIV THE SPIRITS OF THE
YELLOW RIVER
XLV THE DRAGON-PRINCESS
XLVI HELP IN NEED
XLVII THE DISOWNED PRINCESS
XLVIII FOX-FIRE

GHOST STORIES
XLIX THE TALKING SILVER FOXES
L THE CONSTABLE
LI THE DANGEROUS REWARD
LII RETRIBUTION
LIII THE GHOST WHO WAS FOILED
LIV THE PUNISHMENT OF GREED
LV THE NIGHT ON THE BATTLEFIELD
LVI THE KINGDOM OF THE OGRES
LVII THE MAIDEN WHO WAS STOLEN AWAY
LVIII THE FLYING OGRE
LIX BLACK ARTS

HISTORIC LEGENDS
LX THE SORCERER OF THE WHITE LOTUS LODGE
LXI THE THREE EVILS
LXII HOW THREE HEROES CAME BY THEIR DEATHS BECAUSE OF TWO PEACHES
LXIII HOW THE RIVER-GODS WEDDING WAS BROKEN OFF
LXIV DSCHANG LIANG
LXV OLD DRAGONBEARD
LXVI HOW MOLO STOLE THE LOVELY ROSE-RED
LXVII THE GOLDEN CANISTER
LXVIII YANG GUI FE
LXIX THE MONK OF THE YANGTZE-KIANG
LITERARY FAIRY TALES
LXX THE HEARTLESS HUSBAND
LXXI GIAUNA THE BEAUTIFUL
LXXII THE FROG PRINCESS
LXXIII ROSE OF EVENING
LXXIV THE APE SUN WU KUNG

ISBN: 978-1-909302-60-0
URL: http://abelapublishing.com/the-chinese-fairy-book–73-chinese-folk-and-fairy-tales_p26541728.htm

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