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The Rise and Fall of the Toltec Empire - Baba Indaba Children's Stories

The Rise and Fall of the Toltec Empire – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 73

In this 73rd story from Baba Indaba’s Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the story of the founding of the Toltec empire in 566AD to it’s fall four hundred years later……….…… Download and read this interesting story, rewritten and shortened for children which tells of good intentions  and what happens when rulers become corrupt.

eBook Link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_RISE_AND_FALL_OF_THE_TOLTEC_EMPIR?id=AWidDAAAQBAJ

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

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The Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name “Anon E. Mouse” which, of course, is a play on the word “Anonymous”.

In Issue 60 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Hopi tale of what happened during raid on a Navaho village during a ceremonial dance.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_HOPI_RAID_ON_A_NAVAHO_DANCE_A_Hopi?id=5l4JDAAAQBAJ

60-cover

In Issue 59 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the European folktale of how gullible people in the world are. A poor farm laborer, sends his wife to market to sell their last hen. But then starts the story of how he and his wife used the gullibility of people to trade their way to a more comfortable life. But just how did they do it? Download and read the story to find out how.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_GULLIBLE_WORLD_An_Eastern_European?id=VlMJDAAAQBAJ

59-a-gullible-world

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 55

In Issue 55 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Norse Legend of how Frigga, wife of Odin, appeared in vision to a shepherd and gave him seeds to sow and care for. But what were the seeds and how did they change the world we live in?

You’re invited to download and read the story to find out how it all happened!

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS!

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

Download here -> https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_GIFT_FROM_FRIGGA_A_Norse_Legend?id=VdcIDAAAQBAJ

A Gift From Frigga - Cover

A Gift From Frigga – Cover

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 53

In Issue 53 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates an old French tale called The French Puck. Among the mountain pastures and valleys that lie in the centre of France there dwelt a mischievous kind of spirit, whose delight it was to play tricks on everybody, and particularly on the shepherds and the cowboys. They never knew when they were safe from him, as he could change himself into a man, woman or child, a stick, a goat, a ploughshare. He was eventually found out when he tried to turn himself into a needle and thread. Download and read the story to find out just what happened!

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

INCLUDES LINKS TO 5 FREE DOWNLOADS

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

URL: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_FRENCH_PUCK_A_fairy_story_from_Cent?id=5soIDAAAQBAJ

 

A French Puck - Cover - FREE EBOOK

A French Puck – Cover – FREE EBOOK

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 52

In Issue 52 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Australian tale of how the fish did not always live in the water. This is a story of how they changed their living environment. But where did they first live you might ask? Well you’ll just have to read the story to find out.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia and Polynesia, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

This book also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

 

URL: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_HOW_THE_FISH_GOT_INTO_WATER_An_Austra?id=JxD4CwAAQBAJ

 

How the Fish Got Into Water - cover - FREE EBOOK

How the Fish Got Into Water – cover – FREE EBOOK

The Wind Rider - Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 41

The Wind Rider – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories Issue 41

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 41

In Issue 41 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Norse legend of The Wind Rider – A long, time ago, in a land far, far away, a magician was once upon a time much put out with a young countryman. In a fit of rage and spite he curses the young man to ride the wind of the storm for seven years. But these things have a way of backfiring on those with evil intent. Read the story to find out what happens.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_WIND_RIDER_A_Norse_tale?id=WvIEDAAAQBAJ

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