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STUDY OF AN OLD MAN (MILAN)

STUDY OF AN OLD MAN (Milan)
from the ebook THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI
49 pen and ink sketches and studies by the Master

 

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Once you have purchased this most excellent product from our Store, be sure to visit our ebook store for the full set of all 49 pen and ink sketches. Click this link for THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI ebook at https://store.streetlib.com/en/illustrated-by-leonardo-da-vinci/the-drawings-of-leonardo-da-vinci-49-pen-and-ink-sketches-and-studies-by-the-master/

 

Hashtags: #LeonardodaVinci, #leonardo, #penandink, #drawings, #illustrations, #sketches, #studies, #portrait, #IsabellaDeste, #OldMan, #Draperies, #KneelingFigures, #Bacchus, #Head, #Battle, #Horsemen, #Monsters, #Woman, #Seated, #Ground, #ChildKneeling, #Youth, #onhorseback, #EquestrianStatue, #FrancescoSforza, #Virginmary, #StAnne, #Infant, #Children, #Combat, #Madonna, #HolyFamily, #LastSupper, #Courtyard, #CannonFoundry, #Apostle, #Background, #Adoration, #Magi, #Landscape, #Tree, #Caricatures, #StJohnTheBaptist, #Christ, #Angel, #Hands, #Dragon, #Fighting, #Lion, #Portrait, #Animals, #SixHeads, #Bust, #Woman, #Cartoon, #Drapery, #Figure, #Knight, #Armour, #Leda, #StPhilip, #Girl, #Satyr

THE HEAD OF CHRIST (BRERA GALLERY, MILAN)

THE HEAD OF CHRIST
in the Brera Gallery, Milan from the ebook THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI
49 pen and ink sketches and studies by the Master

 

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Once you have purchased this most excellent product from our Store, be sure to visit our ebook store for the full set of all 49 pen and ink sketches. Click this link for THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI ebook at https://store.streetlib.com/en/illustrated-by-leonardo-da-vinci/the-drawings-of-leonardo-da-vinci-49-pen-and-ink-sketches-and-studies-by-the-master/

 

Hashtags: #LeonardodaVinci, #leonardo, #penandink, #drawings, #illustrations, #sketches, #studies, #portrait, #IsabellaDeste, #OldMan, #Draperies, #KneelingFigures, #Bacchus, #Head, #Battle, #Horsemen, #Monsters, #Woman, #Seated, #Ground, #ChildKneeling, #Youth, #onhorseback, #EquestrianStatue, #FrancescoSforza, #Virginmary, #StAnne, #Infant, #Children, #Combat, #Madonna, #HolyFamily, #LastSupper, #Courtyard, #CannonFoundry, #Apostle, #Background, #Adoration, #Magi, #Landscape, #Tree, #Caricatures, #StJohnTheBaptist, #Christ, #Angel, #Hands, #Dragon, #Fighting, #Lion, #Portrait, #Animals, #SixHeads, #Bust, #Woman, #Cartoon, #Drapery, #Figure, #Knight, #Armour, #Leda, #StPhilip, #Girl, #Satyr

PORTRAIT OF ISABELLA D'ESTE (LOUVRE)

PORTRAIT OF ISABELLA D’ESTE (in the LOUVRE)
from the ebook THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI
49 pen and ink sketches and studies by the Master

 

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Once you have purchased this most excellent product from our Store, be sure to visit our ebook store for the full set of all 49 pen and ink sketches. Click this link for THE DRAWINGS OF LEONARDO DA VINCI ebook at https://store.streetlib.com/en/illustrated-by-leonardo-da-vinci/the-drawings-of-leonardo-da-vinci-49-pen-and-ink-sketches-and-studies-by-the-master/

 

Hashtags: #LeonardodaVinci, #leonardo, #penandink, #drawings, #illustrations, #sketches, #studies, #portrait, #IsabellaDeste, #OldMan, #Draperies, #KneelingFigures, #Bacchus, #Head, #Battle, #Horsemen, #Monsters, #Woman, #Seated, #Ground, #ChildKneeling, #Youth, #onhorseback, #EquestrianStatue, #FrancescoSforza, #Virginmary, #StAnne, #Infant, #Children, #Combat, #Madonna, #HolyFamily, #LastSupper, #Courtyard, #CannonFoundry, #Apostle, #Background, #Adoration, #Magi, #Landscape, #Tree, #Caricatures, #StJohnTheBaptist, #Christ, #Angel, #Hands, #Dragon, #Fighting, #Lion, #Portrait, #Animals, #SixHeads, #Bust, #Woman, #Cartoon, #Drapery, #Figure, #Knight, #Armour, #Leda, #StPhilip, #Girl, #Satyr

TITCH_Front_Cover-A5-Centered

TOLD IN THE COFFEE HOUSE

29 Turkish and Islamic Folk Tales

Herein are 29 of the most notable Turkish and Islamic stories recorded and translated by Adler in partnership with Allan Ramsay.

Herein you will find stories like:
HOW THE HODJA SAVED ALLAH
THE HANOUM AND THE UNJUST CADI
HOW COBBLER AHMET BECAME THE CHIEF ASTROLOGER
THE WISE SON OF ALI PASHA
THE MERCIFUL KHAN
KING KARA-KUSH OF BITHYNIA
WE KNOW NOT WHAT THE DAWN MAY BRING FORTH
THE EFFECTS OF RAKI
and many, many more.

You are invited to download these 29 stories in ebook form for only US$1.99

Link: https://store.streetlib.com/en/anon-e-mouse/told-in-the-coffee-house-29-turkish-and-islamic-folk-tales/

 

It must be noted that while Turkish folklore is entertaining and is guaranteed to give rise to a smile, a chuckle or even laughter, the stories do have a gravity of their own and will impart a wisdom only found in Eastern lands.

During the course of a number of visits to Istanbul, Cyrus Adler* became interested in the tales that were being told in the coffee houses of the city, and many they were.

Turkish Coffee Houses have an intimacy which encourages the sharing of stories. They usually consist of a little more than rooms, with walls made of small panes of glass. The furniture consists of a tripod with a contrivance for holding the kettle, and a fire to keep the coffee boiling. A carpeted bench traverses the entire length of the room. This is occupied by turbaned Turks, their legs folded under them, smoking hookahs or chibouks, and sipping coffee. A few will be engaged in a game of backgammon, but the majority enter into conversation, at first only in syllables, which gradually gives rise to a general discussion. Finally, some sage of the neighborhood comes in, and the company appeals to him to settle the point at issue. This he usually does by telling a story to illustrate his opinion. Some of the stories told on these occasions are adaptations of those already known in Arabic and Persian literature, but the Turkish mind gives them a new setting and a peculiar philosophy. They are characteristic of the habits, customs, and methods of thought of the people, and for this reason seem worthy of preservation.

Most of the stories have been collected by Mr. Allan Ramsay, who, by a long residence in Constantinople, has had special, and many, opportunities for learning to know the modern Turk.
Cyrus Adler (1863 – 1940) was an American educator, Jewish religious leader and scholar.
==============
KEYWORDS/TAGS: fairy tales, folklore, myths, legends, children’s stories, children’s stories, bygone era, fairydom, fairy land, classic stories, children’s bedtime stories, fables, Adventures, Turkey, Turkish, coffee house, one, man, Ahmet, Pasha, Jew, wife, Hodja, money, Hadji, Dervish, piasters, father, Cadi, gold, Halid, Allah, Sultan, Ben, Hussein, woman, house, devil, Moïse, horse, Vizier, Grand, Imam, Armenian, thousand, Hanoum, husband, Effendi, Chief, Majesty, olives, judges, slave, Turk, Patriarch, Palace, children, friend, goose, Stamboul, Brother, Alas, God, spokesman, Paradise, priest, monkey, smith, Ali, box, people, twelve, Jesus, Khan, astrologer, Janissary, Governor, begger, Hassan, beadle, faith, death, stranger, necklace, blessing, judgment, desire, master, thief, peace, hands, birds, sword, Forty, heart, dream, true, arm, 25, twenty-five, Astrologer, Detective, statement, pleasure, justice, village, farrier, funeral, punish, tailor, spirit, Egypt, baker, alone, Osman, Porte, child, third, blood, short, Avram, youth, possessions, Mohammed, history, journey, despair, Chepdji, window, evil, rose, Wise, wisdom, conversation, disappear, apprentice, protest, Mustapha, steward Scutari, towers, prison, garden, Bekri, Abdul, raki, Janissaries, thirty-nine, horseshoes, Inshallah, Dervish, gunsmith, Chacham, turban, Konak, Agha, thunderstruck, flute-player, gentlemen, medjidies, Chapkin, baker

A PUZZLE - Old Scottish Riddle - A Baba Indaba Children's Story

A PUZZLE – Old Scottish Riddle – A Baba Indaba Children’s Story

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 77

In Issue 77 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates an old Scottish riddle used to teach children. It goes something like this…..in Scotland, there was a custom once through the Gældom, when a man would die, that the whole people of the place would gather together to the house in which the dead man was called Tigh aire faire (the shealing of watching, now better known as a wake), and they would be at drinking, and singing, and telling tales, till the white day should come.

 

At this time they were gathered together in the house of watching, and there was a man in this house, and when the tale went about, he had neither tale nor song, and as he had not, he was put out at the door. When he was put out he stood at the end of the barn; he was afraid to go farther. He was but a short time standing when a number of apparitions passed him by. When he asked an old woman for an explanation, he was left even more perplexed…… So what was so mystifying about the apparitions and the explanation he received? Well you’ll just have to download and read the story to find out what went on.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

 

eBooks available in PDF and ePub formats. Link: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_A_PUZZLE_An_Old_Scottish_Riddle?id=Ec8VDAAAQBAJ

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 49
In Issue 49 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the story about the fairies who borrow household items from an old woman but who always leave a gift in payment. The old woman comes up with plan to outfox the fairies and get them to use their magic to achieve her own selfish ambitions, but with disastrous consequences – for we all know you can’t outfox a fairy. Look out for the moral in the tale.
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
A Fairy Borrowing / When Fairies Borrow

A Fairy Borrowing / When Fairies Borrow

During the next twenty years many more white men came and settled on or near the lands of the Wampanoags.

In the mean time, Philip grew to manhood and received the same education that was given to the other young men of his tribe. It was very different from the education received by us to-day. The Indians had no schools. Philip did not learn his A B C’s or the multiplication table. He never learned how to read or write. He knew nothing about science, and could not even count, or keep track of time.

His education was of a different character, and was intended to make him brave, daring, hardy, and able to bear pain; for these things were thought by the Indians to be of the greatest importance.

He was taught to undergo the most horrible tortures without a word of complaint or a sign of anguish. He would beat his shins and legs with sticks, and run prickly briars and brambles into them in order to become used to pain. He would run eighty to one hundred miles in one day and back in the next two.

When he neared manhood he was blindfolded and taken into the woods far from home to a place where he had never been before.

There he was left with nothing but a hatchet, a knife, and a bow and arrows. The winter was before him, and he was expected to support himself through it. If he was unable to do so, it was better for him to die then.

Philip passed the lonely winter far away from home. Many times did he wish that he was back in his father’s wigwam where he could talk with his parents and his brothers and his friends, and know what the palefaces were doing.

But he knew that if he should return to his little village before the winter was over he would be branded as a coward, and never be considered worthy to succeed his father as sachem.

A Young Hunter

A Young Hunter

What, he, Philip, a prince, afraid? No, no, no! Of course he was not afraid. What was there to be afraid of? Had he not always lived in the woods? Still, he was a little lonely, and once in a while he wanted someone to talk with.

So Philip went to work with a will. With his hatchet he cut down some small trees, made them into poles, and placed one end of them in the ground. With his knife he cut some bark from the trees and laid it over the poles so that he had a fairly comfortable shelter from the storms and winds which he knew would soon surely come. Then he spent several days in hunting birds and wild game in the forest. With his bow and arrows he shot enough to support himself through the winter.

Many an adventure did he have. Many a time did he lie down at night without having tasted food during the whole livelong day. Many a savage beast did he see, and on several occasions he climbed trees, or crawled into caves, or ran as fast as he could, to get out of their way.

But he had a strong will. He knew that the son of the grand sachem of the Wampanoags could do anything that any other Indian had done. And so he passed the long, cold winter, bravely and without complaining.

In the spring, when his father and friends came after him, they found him well and strong. His winter’s work had made him healthy and rugged. He was taken home, and a feast was prepared in honor of Massasoit’s son who had returned to his home stronger than when he had gone away the fall before.

During the next two moons—for the Indians counted by moons and not by months as we do—Philip led an idle life. He did no work of any kind. He was taking his vacation after the hard winter life he had led alone in the woods.

But his education was not yet finished. His body had been made strong. It was next necessary to strengthen his constitution against the evil effects of poison. He again went into the forest, and daily found poisonous and bitter herbs and roots. These he bruised and put the juices into water, which he drank.

Then he drank other juices which acted as antidotes and prevented his sickness or death. He did this day after day until his constitution became used to the poisons, and he was able to drink them freely without any harm coming to him.

Then he went home. The people sang and danced and gave him another great feast. He was now considered a man and ready to marry and have a wigwam of his own.

The wedding ceremony was extremely simple. There were no presents, no flowers, no guests, no ceremony, no banquet. Philip simply asked a certain woman to come and live with him. She came and was thereafter his wife, or squaw, as the Indians called her.

We have no record of the date of his marriage, for the Indians kept no such records. We only know that it took place soon after his return from his battle with poisons in the woods.

TWO women quarrelled, and one of them went out secretly at night and dug a deep pit in the middle of the path leading from her enemy’s house to the village well.

Early next morning, when all were going to the well for water with jars balanced on their heads, this woman fell into the pit and cried loudly for help.

Her friends ran to her and, seizing her by the hair, began to pull her out  of the pit. To their surprise, her hair stretched as they pulled, and by the time she was safely on the path, her hair was as long as a man’s arm.

This made her very much ashamed, and she ran away and hid herself.

But after a while she realized that her long hair was beautiful, and then  she felt very proud and scorned all the short-haired women, jeering at them. When they saw this, they were consumed with jealousy, and began to be ashamed of their short hair. “We have men’s hair,” they said to one another. “How beautiful it would be to have long hair!”

So one by one they jumped into the pit, and their friends pulled them out by the hair.

And in this way they, and all women after them, had long hair.

————————-

From: YORUBA LEGENDS

ISBN: 978-1-907256-33-2

http://www.abelapublishing.com/cg_yor.html

A percentage of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to the SOS Children’s Village in Asiakwa, Ghana

Yoruba Legends 1929 M I Ogumefu