ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 50
In Issue 50 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Celtic story about how a hard-hearted woman shoos away a stray dog and how another woman shows kindness and compasion to another. The tale tells of which of the two women the fairies rewarded and whom they did not.
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
A Fairy Dog

A Fairy Dog

 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 49
In Issue 49 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the story about the fairies who borrow household items from an old woman but who always leave a gift in payment. The old woman comes up with plan to outfox the fairies and get them to use their magic to achieve her own selfish ambitions, but with disastrous consequences – for we all know you can’t outfox a fairy. Look out for the moral in the tale.
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
A Fairy Borrowing / When Fairies Borrow

A Fairy Borrowing / When Fairies Borrow

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 48
In Issue 48 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the legend about the Death of Tupac, King of the Inca and the subsequent events. Following King Tupac’s death his appointed heir took the throne, but as in so many transfers of power, a younger brother thought he should have been appointed. This follows a period of civil war which was only brought to an end by another cataclysmic event which brought the mighty Inca age to a close.
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
The Death of Tupac King of the Inca - Baba Indaba Children's Stories

The Death of Tupac King of the Inca – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 47
In Issue 47 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates two legends from ancient Burma, modern day Myanmar. The first is the tale of “The Disrespectful Daughter” – a tale with a moral for young people. The second is a folk tale, also with a moral, about three sisters who open their front door to a hungry tiger.
This issue also has the “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
Two Burmese Folk Tales

Two Burmese Folk Tales

Two San Bushman Tales

Two San Bushman Tales

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 46

 
In Issue 46 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates two legends from the bushmen of the Namib Desert. The stories are “How the Coming of a Snake Announces a Death in the Family” and “The Resurrection of the Ostrich.” Both legends are a mix of Bushmen folklore and customs and show how intertwined everyday life in the Namib is with the bush-lore by which the bushmen live.
 
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
46-bushman-rock-art46-snake-clear
ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 45
 
In this 45th story in the Baba Indaba’s Children’s Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the two Welsh fables – THE FABLE OF
 
GWRGAN FARFDRWCH and THE STORY OF THE PIG-TROUGH..……. Download and read these stories to find out what happened to the goat and also what happens to those who upset the fairies.
 
INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES
 
Each issue also has a “WHERE IN THE WORLD – LOOK IT UP” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
Two Welsh Fables

Two Welsh Fables

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 44
 
In Issue 44 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the old European tale of the tailor who through guile and cunning eventually wins the hand of a Princess. Download and read the story to find out the details of just how he achieved his feats.
 
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
A Dozen at a Blow

A Dozen at a Blow

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 43
 
In Issue 43 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the San bushmen legend about why a bushman, when returning home from a hunt. If he is suffering from thirst and dehydration and feels as if he may not reach home, kneels in the dirt and throws up dry sand into the air. Download and read this story to find out why he does this?
 
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
Why a Bushman Throws Sand Into the Air

Why a Bushman Throws Sand Into the Air

A DINNER AND ITS CONSEQUENCES – A Nimpuc American Indian folktale from Massachusetts: Baba Indaba Children’s Stories Issue 42
 
In Issue 42 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the American Indian legend from Massachusetts of “A Dinner and it’s Consequences” which teaches that good manners and politeness always pays dividends.
 
This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.
 
Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.
 
 
It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.
 
The Wind Rider - Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 41

The Wind Rider – Baba Indaba Children’s Stories Issue 41

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 41

In Issue 41 of the Baba Indaba Children’s Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Norse legend of The Wind Rider – A long, time ago, in a land far, far away, a magician was once upon a time much put out with a young countryman. In a fit of rage and spite he curses the young man to ride the wind of the storm for seven years. But these things have a way of backfiring on those with evil intent. Read the story to find out what happens.

This issue also has a “Where in the World – Look it Up” section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT – use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children’s stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as “Father of Stories”.

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Anon_E_Mouse_THE_WIND_RIDER_A_Norse_tale?id=WvIEDAAAQBAJ